Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Navigating an integrated yeast network

01.06.2005


Scientists have for the first time mapped multiple complex biological interactions in a yeast cell in a simple graphical form, enhancing our understanding of how the networks of interaction by which components of a cell influence one another. New research published in the Open Access journal Journal of Biology shows that such maps can also reveal cryptic interactions and enable accurate predictions about interactions that haven’t been observed experimentally.



A living cell contains thousands of proteins, genes and macromolecules, enmeshed in complex webs of relationships involving direct or indirect contact. At the simplest level, some recurring patterns of interconnections occur more frequently than expected in randomized networks, and these are called ’network motifs’. Lan Zhang from Harvard Medical School, USA, and colleagues found that the concept of ’network themes’ – recurring complex patterns that encompass multiple occurrences of network motifs – allows the building of ’thematic maps’ of interactions between macromolecules that can be tied to biological phenomena and may help represent more fundamental network design principles than do simple motifs.

Zhang et al. integrated five different types of biological relationships found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae: protein-protein interactions, genetic interactions, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology and expression correlation. The authors are the first to integrate so many types of data to search for network motifs. The authors conclude that most network motifs found in the integrated S. cerevisae network can be understood in terms of just a few network themes, associated with specific biological phenomena.


Their results also show that thematic maps can highlight previously unknown relationships between functional modules in a cell. In addition, they can be used to predict interactions that are hard to identify experimentally, or to predict the function of genes involved in specific themes.

According to Markus Herrgard and Bernhard Palsson of University of California, San Diego, the authors’ approach can be readily extended to different types of cellular networks. "[T]he thousands of physical and functional interactions that exist within all cells can begin to be untangled to provide [the] basis for detailed network reconstruction and to elucidate fundamental organizational principles of biological networks."

Juliette Savin | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.biomedcentral.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation
24.05.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht Carcinogenic soot particles from GDI engines
24.05.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Devils Hole: Ancient Traces of Climate History

24.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences

A CLOUD of possibilities: Finding new therapies by combining drugs

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>