Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene mutation in Crohn’s disease stops body-bug chat

20.05.2005


A gene commonly mutated in Crohn’s disease sufferers is responsible for allowing the body’s immune system to ‘chat’ to microbes in the gut. Researchers at Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust and Imperial College London who have uncovered the role of this gene say that it will now be possible to develop better tests for this debilitating disease, and will help researchers to uncover the genetic basis of Crohn’s and similar inflammatory bowel diseases.



Writing in the journal The Lancet tomorrow (21 May), the Hammersmith researchers describe the effect that mutations in the gene, known as NOD2/CARD15, has on the release of immune system molecules in the gut. Normally, the gene produces a protein that is involved in recognising bacteria in the gut. This recognition prevents the initiation of an early immune response, which subsequently leads to the lining of the gut becoming inflamed. In around a quarter of Crohn’s disease sufferers, mutations in the NOD2/CARD15 gene prevent this communication from taking place.

“The NOD2/CARD15 system was the first genetic defect found to be associated with Crohns disease, but until now we haven’t been able to understand exactly why this caused the disease,” comments study leader Dr David van Heel, gastroenterologist at Hammersmith Hospital and Imperial College London. “Our studies suggest that this defect does not allow the immune system to work properly in the very earliest stages of mounting an immune response."


“The body normally senses microbes present in the gut that are essential in maintaining normal gut function, and there is regular cross-talk between the gut lining and the microbes that they contain. This functional defect probably disrupts this natural process.”

“We think that this new finding provides a basis for new tests for Crohn’s disease, with implications for both research and future treatments,” adds Dr van Heel, gastroenterologist at Hammersmith Hospital and Imperial College, who led the study.

Crohn’s disease affects between 30,000 and 60,000 people in the UK, with between 3,000 and 6,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The number of people with Crohn’s disease has been rising steadily, particularly among young people.

It can affect anywhere from the mouth to the anus but most commonly affects the small intestine and/or colon. It causes inflammation, deep ulcers and scarring to the wall of the intestine and often occurs in patches. The main symptoms are pain in the abdomen, urgent diarrhoea, general tiredness and loss of weight. Crohn’s is sometimes associated with other inflammatory conditions affecting the joints, skin and eyes.

"These results, although some way from providing clinical treatment, are extremely encouraging," comments Professor Subrata Ghosh, medical advisor to NACC - the National Association for Colitis and Crohn’s Disease, and one of the co-authors of the study. "In addition to helping patients with this faulty gene, we may find that patients without this particular genetic defect have similar disruptions to other parts of the NOD2/CARD15 system. Our hope is that this will lead to the identification of further genetic defects, and ultimately to new treatment strategies."

Simon Wilde | alfa
Further information:
http://www.hhnt.nhs.uk

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>