Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lipoprotein abnormalities found in severely obese children

02.05.2005


Severely obese children have lipoprotein profiles that signal early risk of cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Sixth Annual Scientific Conference on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.



"The message is urgent about the importance of prevention of cardiovascular disease in childhood. Lifestyle modification with appropriate diet and exercise can reduce cardiovascular risk in children," said lead author Daniel L. Preud’Homme, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the Wright State University School of Medicine and director of the lipid clinic at The Children’s Medical Center, both in Dayton, Ohio.

Lipoproteins transport cholesterol throughout the body. Lipoprotein subclasses and the size of lipoprotein particles can be measured by a test that uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to provide a more detailed lipid profile than standard lipid panels.


High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is sometimes called "good" cholesterol because it returns cholesterol to the liver where it can be eliminated. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is often called "bad" cholesterol because of its association with clogged arteries and increased cardiovascular risk. In addition, studies have linked smaller LDL particle size with higher risk.

The study focused on 160 children, average age 12.6 years, who were evaluated at Wright State University’s pediatric lipid clinic. Severe (morbid) obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) of 36 and above, which is higher than that of 99 percent of children the same age and gender (the 99th percentile on BMI growth charts).

Of the children, 53 percent were boys and 47 percent were girls. Seventy percent were categorized as white/other, including four children who were Hispanic, Native American or Asian, while 30 percent were black.

They found differences between black and white children in the sizes and subclasses of the lipoproteins.

"The obese white children have significantly higher early risk of cardiovascular disease than the obese black children according to this test," Preud’Homme said.

This was an unexpected finding because other studies have found the opposite to be true in the general population for a variety of risk factors including high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, he said.

In this study, differences between the two groups include:

  • Low levels of "good" large HDL particles were found in 46 percent of white children compared to 29 percent of black children, representing significantly increased cardiovascular risk.
  • High levels of large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) were identified in 62 percent of white children compared to 31 percent of black children, also a significant increase in risk.
  • LDL pattern B – a lipid profile with an unusually high number of small, dense LDL particles that is thought to confer higher cardiovascular risk – was found in 45 percent of white children compared to 19 percent of black children.
  • Obese white children were shown to have a higher risk of experiencing the dyslipidemia associated with metabolic syndrome than obese black children. Fifty-three percent of white children were identified with two or more blood lipoprotein levels associated with metabolic syndrome (small LDL, low numbers of large HDL and increased VLDL) compared to 21 percent of black children.

Lipid abnormalities are part of a cluster of conditions comprising the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also closely associated with a generalized metabolic disorder called insulin resistance, in which the body cannot efficiently use insulin. People with the metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

The study found no gender differences for lipoprotein variables.

Carole Bullock | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.heart.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>