Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Method shows how precisely gene expression signals are copied in DNA replication

20.04.2005


Genetic information that determines hair color or whether an individual might develop a particular cancer is passed from one generation to the next through DNA. Genes encoded in the DNA contain information, but a process called methylation is one factor that often controls how that information is expressed.



A group of University of Washington researchers has devised a method that combines DNA sampling and mathematical modeling to find out how accurately methylation patterns are copied during DNA replication. That could pave the way for understanding the role methylation plays in normal gene expression and how it factors in the development of human disease.

In methylation, a methyl group (made up of a carbon atom and three hydrogen atoms) is attached to a specific gene sequence in one part of DNA. The density of methyl saturation determines how the gene is expressed. The densest saturation turns the gene off so that it is not expressed at all, and less-dense saturation allows the gene to be expressed at different levels.


The result can be obvious, for instance, in a calico cat and its multicolored coat, said Diane Genereux, a visiting UW biology graduate student and lead author of a paper describing the new measuring technique in the April 19 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"In a calico cat, different genes that express coat color are on and off in different parts of the cat’s coat, so you get patches of different-colored fur," Genereux said.

Methylation typically passes from genes in a DNA strand to the same genes in a daughter strand created during DNA replication. The new technique allows researchers to examine how faithfully this "maintenance" methylation is carried out across generations and how consistently it occurs on the same gene sequence, said Brooks Miner, a UW research scientist in biology and a co-author of the paper.

But DNA molecules also can undergo what is called "de novo," or new, methylation in which a methyl group shows up on a DNA strand at a place where it did not appear before. That could change how that particular gene sequence is expressed.

Understanding methylation rates is important because the rate of genetic mutation is very low, a tiny fraction of 1 percent, while the rate of methylation changes that alter or suppress gene expression is substantially higher.

In the past, researchers could look at only one strand of DNA at a time and so could not conduct a side-by-side comparison of where methylation was occurring. An earlier paper from the same research group, led by Charles Laird, a UW biology professor, introduced a molecular method to look at both DNA strands together and observe methylation differences between them.

"When we look at both DNA strands, we know one strand has to be the parent and one has to be the daughter, but we don’t know which is which," Miner said. "The new mathematical model allows us to infer the rates of both maintenance and de novo methylation without directly identifying parent and daughter DNA strands."

Ultimately, such knowledge could lead to better understanding of, perhaps even treatment for, some cancers or genetic conditions such as one called fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of genetic mental impairments, from slight learning disabilities to severe cognitive disorders. Fragile X is caused by abnormal methylation of a gene called FMR1, Miner said, and other conditions have similar causes.

"Methylation is a normal biological process that, in the case of fragile X, is happening at the wrong place at the wrong time," he said. "It’s a basic process, but it’s not fully understood."

The new method lets the researchers see how consistently methylation occurs in different places on a DNA strand. Applying mathematical models to a DNA sequence allows them to measure methylation rates for different areas of the genome, Genereux said.

"As with any inference, we know we’re not going to get the precise rates," she said. "To get an exact answer, we’d have to look at all the cells in an individual. Our method provides a way to get useful approximations from a small DNA sample."

Vince Stricherz | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.washington.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats
17.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
16.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>