Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New technique finds molecules necessary for cancer metastasis

05.04.2005


Provides unique drug targets to prevent spread

Tufts University researchers have identified several proteins on the surface of cancer cells that contribute to the cells’ ability to metastasize. When the researchers destroyed these particular proteins, the cancerous cells show a significant decrease in their ability to invade healthy cells – a finding that provides a new target for badly needed drugs. Although most cancer deaths occur from metastasis, not from the original cancer itself, no drug treatments are currently available specifically to prevent the spread of the cancer from the original site to other organs. The team also has discovered new roles related to the spread of cancer in two molecules known for other, non-cancer activities.

Dr. Daniel Jay presented the study on Sunday, April 3, at Experimental Biology 2005 in San Diego, as part of the scientific sessions of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.



The findings were made possible, says Dr. Jay, because he and his colleagues have developed a new Fluorform-Assisted Light Inactivation technology (FALI) that is a new generation of the Chromophore-Assisted Laser Inactivation (CALI) technique he created 17 years ago to inactivate specific proteins in living cells at precise times and locations. The researchers are able to destroy a specific protein, sparing all other proteins attached to the cell as well as the cell itself, by targeting the antibody to that specific cell. They tag the antibody with a dye that absorbs a specific wavelength of light. When the light is turned on (earlier technology required lasers; the new FALI technology needs only the light of a slide projector), the light energy absorbed by the dye in the antibody generates free radicals that destroy the specific protein bound by that antibody.

What gives the new FALI approach its power, says Dr. Jay, is its high throughput and its ability to couple with the large antibody libraries now available. Whereas the team used to look at one protein at a time, it now can rapidly scan thousands of the proteins associated with cancer cells, systematically "knocking out" one at a time and looking for those whose absence on the cell causes a significant decrease in invasiveness.

At the Experimental Biology 2005, Dr. Jay also describes two of the molecules identified by the FALI approach to have large implications for metastasis. Both were well known to scientists, but the Jay team is the first to recognize the roles they play in cancer. The first molecule, HSP90A, is a molecular chaperone that facilities the folding and activation of different proteins within the cells. The Jay laboratory was the first to recognize HSP90A also had a role outside the cell; it activates a particular matrix metalloprotease required for restructuring the surrounding matrix as cells move and invade.

The second molecule, the polio virus receptor CD155, has been recognized for decades as the pathway by which the polio virus is able to enter motor neurons in the nervous system. Dr. Jay and his team have found that the receptor also plays a role in how brain tumor cells move in the brain, spreading to healthy cells.

"Our current interest is cell motility related to the spread of cancer," says Dr. Jay, "but the speed and sensitivity of the FALI approach gives it wide applicability as a method to identify functionally important proteins in a variety of disease processes."

Coauthors of the presentation are Brenda Eustace, Takashi Sakurai, and Kevin Sloan. Funding for the study came from the National Cancer Institute and the Goldhirsh Foundation.

Sarah Goodwin | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.faseb.org/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>