Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

NIH skate choice follows MDI Bio Lab white paper

21.03.2005


With the National Institutes of Health announcing recently that the genome of the skate is going to be sequenced, the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory is poised to play an important role in this large-scale project.



The decision to fund the sequencing of the skate was in response to a proposal submitted by MDIBL, the Genome Sequencing Center of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Benaroya Institute in Seattle. Approval came from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), one of the National Institutes of Health.

The skate is one of 11 strategically selected non-mammalian organisms determined by a NHGRI panel to have the greatest potential to fill crucial gaps in human biomedical knowledge. According to Dr. Mark S. Guyer, Director of NHGRI’s Division of Extramural Research, "The most effective approach we currently have to identify the essential functional and structural components of the human genome is to compare it with the genomes of other organisms."


It has been shown that most human genome sequences originated long before humans themselves. Consequently, scientists will use the genomes of non-mammalian animals to learn more about how, when and why the human genome came to be composed of certain DNA sequences, as well as to gain new insights into organization of genomes. In addition, many of these organisms can shed light on human disease by systematically discovering causes compared to finding them by chance.

The skate, a member of the elasmobranch family, is one of the oldest vertebrate organisms, dating back 450 million years. Elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays) were one of the first primitive vertebrate species to develop a jaw, an important step on the evolutionary ladder.

For more than 100 years the MDIBL has served as a world leader in elasmobranch research. As one of only four Marine and Freshwater Biomedical Science Centers in the United States designated by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MDIBL has been home to scores of scientific experts utilizing sharks and skates to better understand human physiology, toxicology, immunology, stem cell and cancer biology, and neurobiology.

Dr. David Barnes, Senior Scientist and Associate Director of the Center for Marine Functional Genomic Studies at MDIBL said, "MDIBL is one of only a handful of research institutions in the world that specializes in elasmobranch research. Scientists here have been using the skate as a model since the early 1920’s and are largely responsible for development of the skate as a model organism for human disease. The result is that we have a high concentration of information and expertise on elasmobranch organisms and are well positioned to support this important initiative."

Data from the skate sequencing project will be integrated into MDIBL’s Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, an interactive database designed to assist scientists worldwide in comparing genetic information from more than 40,000 species in an effort to better understand genetic susceptibility to environmental toxins and disease.

"The decision to sequence the skate genome is an enormous step forward in the emerging field of marine functional genomics," said John N. Forrest, Jr., MD, Director of MDIBL. "Elasmobranch genomes hold many important clues to understanding the genes involved in development and disease. All of us at MDIBL are very pleased that the tremendous research potential of the skate will now be realized."

Grady Holloway | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ctd.mdibl.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>