Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Termites a major threat to Victoria


Subterranean termites pose a major threat to dwellings and other vital infrastructure throughout Victoria according to a report released today by CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products (CFFP) scientist, Jim Creffield.

Mr Creffield says that in order to effectively manage the pest, all municipalities state-wide must immediately be ’termite declared’.

The report draws upon the expertise of the CSIRO Termite Group - comprised of ensis (a recently formed joint venture of CFFP and Forest Research, New Zealand) and CSIRO Entomology.

The annual cost of repair of damage to timber-in-service caused by termites in Victoria has been estimated to be in excess of $200 million.

Of the state’s 78 municipalities, 30 are not currently designated as being at risk of termite infestation of homes and other private and public structures. "However, no municipality in metropolitan Melbourne, for example, is devoid of infestation by termites," Mr Creffield says. He says redesignation of undeclared (unprotected) municipalities to ’declared’ status should be enacted through state legislation or individual council motion.

It is estimated that 650,000 Australian homes have been infested by termites over the last five years. The cost of treatment and repair of the resultant damage has been estimated at $3.9 billion. In undeclared areas, builders are not required to install termite management systems (TMS) during construction. "It is far more economical to have a TMS or barriers installed, than to incur damage and consequent restoration costs," Mr Creffield says. "Normal building insurance does not cover damage caused by termites - it is the responsibility of the owners."

Mr Creffield has over 30 years experience in the biology and control of termites and believes that regardless of the type of construction, without an adequate TMS termite infestation will almost certainly occur at some stage during the life of the structure.

A mature nest of termites can consist of over a million insects headed by a queen capable of laying up to 2000 eggs per day. Termites can feed on timber and timber products at up to 100m from their nests and can travel greater distances when provided with access to gaps, cracks, crevices or construction materials including pipes and cables. Termites will even attack electrical wiring cables, conduits and power points.

An infestation is often not detected until it is so severe that structural damage has occurred and substantial repairs and material replacement are required.

The full report can be viewed and downloaded from the CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products website at or through Termite Action Victoria at

Bill Stephens | CSIRO Media
Further information:

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Signaling Pathways to the Nucleus
19.03.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht In monogamous species, a compatible partner is more important than an ornamented one
19.03.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Ornithologie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

Im Focus: ILA 2018: Laser alternative to hexavalent chromium coating

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

When the EU restricted the use of hexavalent chromium compounds to special applications requiring authorization, the move prompted a rethink in the surface...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensions

19.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

19.03.2018 | Materials Sciences

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>