Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Termites a major threat to Victoria

18.01.2005



Subterranean termites pose a major threat to dwellings and other vital infrastructure throughout Victoria according to a report released today by CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products (CFFP) scientist, Jim Creffield.

Mr Creffield says that in order to effectively manage the pest, all municipalities state-wide must immediately be ’termite declared’.

The report draws upon the expertise of the CSIRO Termite Group - comprised of ensis (a recently formed joint venture of CFFP and Forest Research, New Zealand) and CSIRO Entomology.



The annual cost of repair of damage to timber-in-service caused by termites in Victoria has been estimated to be in excess of $200 million.

Of the state’s 78 municipalities, 30 are not currently designated as being at risk of termite infestation of homes and other private and public structures. "However, no municipality in metropolitan Melbourne, for example, is devoid of infestation by termites," Mr Creffield says. He says redesignation of undeclared (unprotected) municipalities to ’declared’ status should be enacted through state legislation or individual council motion.

It is estimated that 650,000 Australian homes have been infested by termites over the last five years. The cost of treatment and repair of the resultant damage has been estimated at $3.9 billion. In undeclared areas, builders are not required to install termite management systems (TMS) during construction. "It is far more economical to have a TMS or barriers installed, than to incur damage and consequent restoration costs," Mr Creffield says. "Normal building insurance does not cover damage caused by termites - it is the responsibility of the owners."

Mr Creffield has over 30 years experience in the biology and control of termites and believes that regardless of the type of construction, without an adequate TMS termite infestation will almost certainly occur at some stage during the life of the structure.

A mature nest of termites can consist of over a million insects headed by a queen capable of laying up to 2000 eggs per day. Termites can feed on timber and timber products at up to 100m from their nests and can travel greater distances when provided with access to gaps, cracks, crevices or construction materials including pipes and cables. Termites will even attack electrical wiring cables, conduits and power points.

An infestation is often not detected until it is so severe that structural damage has occurred and substantial repairs and material replacement are required.

The full report can be viewed and downloaded from the CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products website at www.ffp.csiro.au or through Termite Action Victoria at www.termiteactionvictoria.com.au

Bill Stephens | CSIRO Media
Further information:
http://www.ffp.csiro.au
http://www.termiteactionvictoria.com.au

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery
20.01.2017 | GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH

nachricht Seeking structure with metagenome sequences
20.01.2017 | DOE/Joint Genome Institute

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>