Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Chronic Illness from Faulty Friends

16.12.2004


Immune cells can trigger severe pneumonia



A new study has found that malfunctioning immune cells can be the cause of severe pneumonia. This discovery was made by scientists working at the German Research Centre for Biotechnology (GBF) in Braunschweig. In the latest issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (AJRCCM), GBF researchers describe how mice in their experiments developed a tendency toward chronic inflammation of the lung’s mucous membrane. What they found was that immune cells of the type known as CD 4+T cells bring on such a disease when they inadvertently attack the body’s own tissue instead of the invading pathogen.

Diseases and disruptions to pulmonary alveoli and the lung, lymph and vascular tissues of the respiratory system are termed “Interstitial Lung Disease” (ILD) by the medical profession. Various forms of pneumonia are also classified under the ILD heading and can afflict mice as well as humans. The GBF research group led by Professor Jan Buer working together with colleagues from Yale University in the USA used these mice to prove something scientists had long suspected but until now had been unable to prove: that malfunctioning CD 4+T cells play an active role in the emergence of many forms of ILD.


A better understanding of immune reactions in the lung

“For our research we crossed two breeds of mice,” explains Dr. Dunja Bruder, a GBF researcher. “The first mouse type carried a special protein molecule in the cells of the lung mucous membrane, a so-called antigen,” says Bruder. “The second strain produced aggressive immune cells against exactly this antigen. The result is mice whose immune systems attack their own lung tissue.” These animals then developed ILD symptoms.

Shortly after the faulty immune reaction the coexistence of antigens and the opposing CD 4+ T cells triggered immune tolerance mechanisms: anti-inflammatory messenger substances were released and defensive responses were inhibited. “After a severe and acute outbreak of the illness, the symptoms dissipate suddenly and the illness turns into a chronic disease,” notes Bruder.

Through the study of how the chronic stages develop scientists hope to field a more comprehensive understanding of immune reactions in the lung. “Malfunctioning immune cells,” emphasises Buer, “play a role not only in ILD but also in many other lung diseases such as allergenic asthma. ”Very similar genes are turned on in the cells of sick mice as in sick humans, he says, “so if we understand these processes better we could develop new methods of treatment.”

Manfred Braun | alfa
Further information:
http://www.gbf.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats
17.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
16.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>