Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Genetic testing can identify ischemic and nonischemic heart failure

08.11.2004


Researchers at Johns Hopkins have shown that genetic testing can be effectively used to distinguish between heart failure patients who suffer from ischemic or nonischemic forms of the disease. Using groupings or clusters of a patient’s gene expression to compare to a diseased "test" set that identifies the cause of heart failure, the Hopkins team assembled a 90-gene profile to determine which type of heart failure had most likely developed. Results showed the test profile to be highly accurate, with 90 percent specificity.



The findings could, if affirmed and adapted to a standardized and affordable test format, someday aid physicians in the diagnosis of heart failure and help determine which kind of therapy is best to use for the condition. In ischemic heart disease, the patient’s arteries have narrowed and the heart cannot pump normally because blood flow (and thus oxygen) is often restricted to the heart muscle. In nonischemic forms of the disease, the heart cannot pump normally because the heart muscle has often enlarged for other reasons, such as physical deformity or alcohol abuse. Both conditions can lead to cardiac arrest or more gradual heart failure as the muscle weakens over time.

"The gene expression differences between various forms of cardiovascular disease are poorly understood, despite the fact that we know there are major differences in what is happening at the cellular level," said Michelle Kittleson, M.D., cardiology fellow at the Johns Hopkins Heart Institute and lead author of the study to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2004 on Nov. 6, as a finalist for the Samuel A. Levine Young Clinical Investigator Award. "Our study shows that gene expression profiling for heart failure patients is not only possible, but accurate as well. Based on these initial findings, we hope to close the gaps in our understanding of the gene expression patterns underlying heart failure and treatments for the illness. Ultimately, we hope to be able to use genetic profiling to classify patients according to their risk of developing all kinds of heart disease."


To create a gene expression profile, or test, the Hopkins team collected 16 biopsy tissue samples, six from patients with the ischemic form of the disease and 10 from nonischemic cases, all with end-stage heart failure. Most of the test samples came from heart transplant patients at Hopkins in the last 20 years. Using a biostatistical technique called prediction analysis, the researchers identified the 90 genes that best distinguished the two kinds of heart failure. The large number of genes used also improved accuracy of the test.

This gene profile was later validated by testing it against 38 other tissue samples, including 14 provided from the University of Minnesota. These test samples involved tissue from all stages of heart failure, including end-stage, post-LVAD (a type of heart surgery) and biopsy samples from newly diagnosed patients.

"Now that we know we can genetically profile heart patients according to ischemic and nonischemic heart disease, our next step is to develop a test that can be used in a clinical setting," said senior study author and cardiologist Joshua Hare, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Heart Institute. "Ischemic patients need to be monitored more closely in case they develop drug resistance and require surgery to unblock clogged arteries. Knowing which patients to treat and how closely to monitor them could significantly improve how well physicians manage the disease and, consequently, improve health outcomes."

David March | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhmi.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Warming ponds could accelerate climate change
21.02.2017 | University of Exeter

nachricht An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever
21.02.2017 | University of Utah

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>