Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pitt researchers identify biomarkers of lupus which could lead to quicker and better diagnosis

04.11.2004


University of Pittsburgh researchers have identified biomarkers that could result in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a devastating disease that affects as many as 1.5 million Americans, and occurs 10 to 15 times more frequently in women. The results are published in the November 2004 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.



"This is the first report of abnormal levels of the protein erythrocyte-C4d in human disease," said lead author Susan Manzi, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of medicine, epidemiology and dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. "Abnormally high levels of erythrocyte-C4d and low levels of erythrocyte-CR1 are characteristic of SLE and combined measurement of the two proteins has high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for lupus."

The significance of the finding is substantial, according to Joseph Ahearn, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and senior author of the study. "Today we are one step closer to providing patients with an immediate and accurate diagnosis, one step closer to providing physicians with the ability to offer better treatment options and one step closer to providing incentive to lower the cost of health care for patients suffering from lupus," Dr. Ahearn said. "Lupus is the prototypical autoimmune disease and arguably the greatest diagnostic challenge among rheumatologic diseases," he said. "The spectrum of disease among patients with SLE is broad and ranges from subtle or vague symptoms to life-threatening multiorgan failure, and the manifestations of lupus often mimic those of other diseases makes it difficult to diagnose."


It is not unusual for a patient with lupus to seek advice from a variety of specialists and subspecialists over a period of years before being accurately diagnosed, which results in delays in receiving proper therapy and an ultimately greater cost for treating the disease and its complications. Although there is no cure for lupus, there are many ways to treat symptoms, including chemotherapy. Currently, most physicians rely on blood abnormalities to aid in the diagnosis of SLE, but according to Dr. Manzi, these tests are inadequate because they are not sensitive or specific enough.

In the study, researchers used blood samples taken from each participant and analyzed them using flow cytometry to compare the levels of proteins in 100 patients who were confirmed to have lupus, 133 patients who had other diseases and conditions including myositis, systemic sclerosis, hepatitis and rheumatoid arthritis, and 84 healthy patients.

Lupus is a widespread and chronic autoimmune disease that, for unknown reasons, causes the immune system to attack the body’s own tissue and organs, including the joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood and skin. The immune system normally protects the body against viruses, bacteria and other foreign materials. In an autoimmune disease like lupus, the immune system loses its ability to tell the difference between foreign substances and its own cells and tissue. The immune system then makes antibodies directed against itself.

Alan Aldinger | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.upmc.edu
http://www.lupuscenter.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht MicroRNA helps cancer evade immune system
19.09.2017 | Salk Institute

nachricht Ruby: Jacobs University scientists are collaborating in the development of a new type of chocolate
18.09.2017 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

New quantum phenomena in graphene superlattices

19.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A simple additive to improve film quality

19.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>