Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists to Fight Invasive Species, Aid Declining Populations

19.07.2004


Invasive species such as white pine blister rust, spotted knapweed and whirling disease in trout, as well as declining populations of plants and animals, are the focus of a new research center at the University of Idaho.



Officials announced the new Center for Research on Invasive Species and Small Populations July 14. UI scientists recently won a nearly $1 million grant from the Idaho Board of Education’s Higher Education Research Council to fund the new center.

“CRISSP brings together some of the finest minds in the state as well as the newest in biotechnology to work on problems fundamental to the traditional mainstays of Idaho’s economy,” said UI Provost Brian Pitcher. “The science produced by these scientists could have a direct and dramatic impact on the economic well-being of the state.”


Degradation or destruction of Idaho’s natural resource base is one of the greatest biological problems facing the state, UI researchers say. They predict the incidence of introduced – and consequently, destructive – species will only increase in years to come, given the increased mobility of human populations and globalized commercial traffic.

Statistics gathered by the Idaho Invasive Species Council support that claim. The group examined one 1999 survey that estimated the annual economic impact nationwide of alien species at some $138 billion in direct losses to agriculture and industry. Losses due to noxious weeds alone are estimated to cost the state approximately $3 million annually.

White pine blister rust, one of Idaho’s first alien invaders, decimated stands of western white pine, one of Idaho’s most valuable tree species. Other recent examples of invasive species in North America that have received widespread attention include the West Nile virus, a viral pathogen affecting animals and humans, and Myxobolus cerebralis, a fish parasite that causes whirling disease in trout.

Another focus of the center will be to provide critical genetic analysis for the management of small plant and animal populations. Declining elk herds, fish stocks, white bark pine populations and other threatened and endangered species pose major challenges to natural resource managers in Idaho.

“The research center will build on the strength of our interdisciplinary collaborations to solve complex natural resources issues,” said UI Vice President for Research Charles R. Hatch.

“Our state and region will be the beneficiaries of the center’s focused, scientific thrusts combining advanced techniques in molecular genetics with traditional approaches to biological and ecological management to maintain and enhance the integrity of our nation’s native plant and animal populations,” Hatch said.

CRISSP builds on existing expertise at the university. The College of Natural Resources’ Laboratory for Ecological and Conservation Genetics contains the equipment and expertise.

Faculty and students from UI CNR, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, College of Science and Lewis-Clark State College will use the lab. They will analyze DNA of invasive species that displace native plants and animals and determine causes for declines of plant and animal populations.

Grant funding will be used to enhance lab technology and increase its capacity with graduate student fellowships, stipends and research budgets and undergraduate summer internships. The grant will provide partial salary for a full-time research scientist to manage the facility and provide training. The center also will help leverage funding that will allow scientists to interact with public schools, managers, landowners and practicing professionals around the state.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.uidaho.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>