Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Annotation marathon validates 21,037 human genes

20.04.2004


International consortium provides the first step towards a comprehensive functional link between the genome sequence scaffold and human diseases



The announcement of the human genome sequence three years ago was widely hailed as one of the great scientific achievements in modern history. But sequencing the genome is just a first step -- the monumental task of ascribing biological meaning to those sequences has just begun. The H-Invitational international consortium, led by Takashi Gojobori (Tokyo, Japan) has taken a significant step towards this goal, by validating and annotating over 20,000 human genes, using publicly available resources.

By relating intermediate gene products called messenger RNAs to each of their parent genes, and exhaustively connecting them to the relevant proteins, the consortium has established a reliable systematic network of human-curated relationships between genes and their biological functions.


The study, reported in the open access journal PLoS Biology, has taken over two years to complete, and is expected to set the standard for analysis of gene expression and human diseases worldwide through the publicly available H-Invitational database. There are estimated to be about 30,000 genes in humans, so having a detailed functional map of a majority of them will be a boon for geneticists, drug researchers and genome scientists around the world. There is a wealth of information, including evidence for several thousand new genes, data about variable expression and genetic variation within the genes.

The consortium has laid the groundwork to address the challenge of connecting the functions of genes and their products to the clinical effects that each of them has upon human health. "We are confident now that anyone in academia or industry who uses our database will gain far deeper insight into the meaning of human disease than was previously possible" stated Professor Gojobori. The work also builds on the traditions of international cooperation and large-scale collaboration, which played such an important part in the deciphering of the sequence itself. The consortium is made up of 152 scientists from developed as well as developing nations, including Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Korea, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.


Citation: Imanishi T, Itoh T, Suzuki Y, O’Donovan C, Fukuchi S, et al. (2004) Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones. PLoS Biol: e162 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0020162

CONTACT:
Takashi Gojobori, Ph.D
Director and Professor, Center for Information
Biology and DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ),
National Institute of Genetics, Mishima 411, Japan
Email: tgojobor@genes.nig.ac.jp
Tel: +81-55-981-6847 Fax: +81-55-981-6848
URL: http://www.cib.nig.ac.jp

Hemai Parthasarathy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.plosbiology.org
http://www.plosbiology.org/plosonline/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.0020162
http://ddbj.nig.ac.jp

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein
24.01.2017 | Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY

nachricht Choreographing the microRNA-target dance
24.01.2017 | UT Southwestern Medical Center

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>