Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers use novel technology to extract RNA from archive formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue

31.03.2004


High quality outcomes allow researchers to identify cancer-related genetic changes that span years



For the first time, Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers have demonstrated the ability to extract RNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples archived for up to five years. What’s more, the technology used retrieves high-quality samples, allowing researchers to identify cancer-related genetic changes. Accepted as a "late-breaking" abstract, the research was presented today at the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research by Renata Coudry, M.D., a research pathologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

"Recent advances in both laser-capture microdissection (LCM) technology and microarray technology have revolutionized our investigation of the genetic basis of human cancer," said Coudry. "Pure cell populations can now be isolated by LCM and evaluated for changes in gene expression that accompany the development of cancer. However, applying these techniques to archived clinical specimens has been limited by our inability to extract high-quality genetic material from routinely processed clinical samples."


Hospitals are required to store tumor samples from surgical procedures in case further testing is needed. Biopsy tissue and other tissue specimens are universally preserved by being fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin, a process that was thought to compromise DNA and RNA integrity. Messenger RNA (mRNA) indicates the activity of genes, or gene expression.

The Paradise Reagent System developed by Arcturus Bioscience Inc. provides an integrated system to isolate and amplify mRNA for analyzing global gene expression in archival specimens.

By retrospectively correlating treatment outcomes and genetic profiles, scientists could learn what genes are involved in certain forms of a specific cancer and tailor individual therapy for each patient. "At Fox Chase, we used the technology with great success to compare the gene expression profiles of normal and colorectal tumor tissue that had been archived for up to five years," Coudry said. "We are already applying this methodology to the identification of new molecular targets that may serve as biomarkers of cancer risk and chemopreventive response."

The Fox Chase group used laser capture to microdissect colonic crypt tissues from the archived samples. They then developed genetic profiles using microarray, or "gene chip," technology to evaluate the genetic changes in the tissue. The procedure uses glass "chips" to hold thousands of gene fragments that can be visualized by a computer. Because genes RNA extracted from in a blood or tissue sample will bind to the corresponding gene fragment on the chip, researchers can analyze the expression of thousands of the sample’s genes at once.


As research pathologist, Coudry works in the Fox Chase laboratory of cell biologist Margie L. Clapper, Ph.D., director of chemoprevention research at Fox Chase. In addition to Coudry and Clapper, Fox Chase co-authors of the study include postdoctoral associate Sibele I. Meireles, Ph.D.; bioinformatician Radka Stoyanova, Ph.D.; Harry S. Cooper, M.D., vice chairman of clinical laboratories and chief of surgical pathology and immunohistochemistry; and Paul F. Engstrom, M.D., senior vice president for population science

Fox Chase Cancer Center, one of the nation’s first comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute in 1974, conducts basic and clinical research; programs of prevention, detection and treatment of cancer; and community outreach. For more information about Fox Chase activities, visit the Center’s web site at www.fccc.edu.

Karen Carter Mallet | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fccc.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Polymers Based on Boron?
18.01.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production
18.01.2018 | Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Polymers Based on Boron?

18.01.2018 | Life Sciences

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

18.01.2018 | Life Sciences

World’s oldest known oxygen oasis discovered

18.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>