Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers publish Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map

09.12.2003


First map of an entire global biome at useable level of detail



Researchers publish vegetation map of the Arctic Tundra Biome

Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB) researcher Donald (Skip) Walker and an international team of Arctic vegetation scientists have published the Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM) – the first map of an entire global biome at such a level of detail.


The 11-year CAVM project, directed by Walker, who also heads IAB’s Alaska Geobotany Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, involved vegetation scientists representing the six countries of the Arctic - Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, and the United States - to map the vegetation and associated characteristics of the circumpolar region, using a common base map.

"A vegetation map of the Arctic is especially needed now because the Arctic is increasingly recognized as a single geoecosystem with a common set of cultural, political, economic, and ecological issues. Accelerated land-use change and climate change in the Arctic made the effort more urgent," Walker said.

The base map is a false-color infrared image created from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data. The map covers the Arctic bioclimate subzone - the region north of the Arctic tree line, with an arctic climate, arctic flora, and tundra vegetation. The map can be viewed on the Web at http://www.geobotany.uaf.edu/cavm/.

The 3-foot by 4-foot, waterproof, tear-proof, field-work-worthy, synthetic-paper map is as beautiful as it is useful. The front of the map shows the circumpolar Arctic color-coded according to the outward appearance of the vegetation and includes color photographs of the various units. The back of the map includes detailed vegetative descriptions, a brief history of the map’s origin, and maps of the bioclimate subzones, floristic provinces, landscapes, percent lake cover, substrate pH, and plant biomass.

Previous maps presented a "disjointed picture of Arctic vegetation, because they were produced using a wide variety of national mapping traditions, legend systems, and map scales," Walker said. The CAVM "is the first to cover the entire Arctic at a reasonable level of detail using a common legend approach. In fact, it is the first map of an entire global biome at such a level of detail."

"I think vegetation scientists and people involved in global (climate) change will be the most excited" about the map, Stephen S. Talbot, research scientist with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in Anchorage, Alaska and member of the CAVM mapping team, said.

"From a conservation perspective, although not so much in Alaska where we have established set-aside lands, but for other countries, especially Russia, this (map) is really critical for selecting areas based on vegetation to be set aside as critical areas," Talbot said.

"For me, one of the important things is that this (map) can be used as an important component of high school education, a tool for students," Talbot said. Students in Kotzebue can use the map to see how their environment is similar to or different from other Arctic environments. "It gives them a chance to see where they fit into the bigger picture."


The CAVM project was funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

Marie Gilbert | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.geobotany.uaf.edu/cavm/
http://www.uaf.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”
05.12.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht The Nagoya Protocol Creates Disadvantages for Many Countries when Applied to Microorganisms
05.12.2016 | Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Shape matters when light meets atom

05.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”

05.12.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>