Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Turkey genome research may help producers breed a better turkey


To the average person, the turkey genome may seem to be a lot of "gobbledygook." But a just-published study in the journal, Genome, will help to ensure that the turkey that we "gobble down" at our Thanksgiving feasts will be a bird that is truly best of breed.

For the first time, researchers from the University of Minnesota and Nicholas Turkey Breeding Farms in California have collaborated to produce the first genome map, or genetic blueprint, of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

In order to decode the genome, researchers first had to collect and separate the DNA. They then applied chemical processes to the samples to enable them to identify the sequences, or ordering, of the building blocks of the DNA. These building blocks are the four different kinds of bases (adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine) that "spell" out the genetic code within the DNA of each species.

To date, a number of studies have succeeded at mapping the chicken genome, but the turkey remained one of the few domestic food animals for which a genome map was not available.

These maps are essential for applying results from genomics projects in model organisms, humans and other agricultural species. The study entitled "A first-generation map of the turkey genome" that is being published in Genome, a journal of the NRC Research Press, will leverage information from the chicken genome so that it can be more efficiently used to breed a better turkey.

Research into the genetic mapping of domestic animals is aimed at identifying specific genetic sequences that could affect traits of economic importance, such as efficient production, increased reproduction or disease resistance.

Dr. David Harry explains, "Finding a way to breed a turkey with naturally occurring beneficial traits is clearly of interest to the poultry-producing industry. Using naturally occurring variations, it is possible build a better turkey – for example one that expresses a natural genetic resistance to certain diseases. This will enable producers to minimize the cost and potential risks of preventive medications required to safely produce the animals that are being bred for human consumption."

Genome is published by the NRC Research Press, which is the publishing arm of the Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI), an Institute of the National Research Council Canada (NRC).

The full article can be accessed online at:

For more information, please contact:

Dr. David E. Harry
Genetic Foundations
P.O. Box 3897
Napa, CA 94558
Tel: (707) 287-7890
Fax: (707) 257-8326

Peter Moens
Department of Biology
York University
4700 Keele St.
North York ON M3J 1P3
Tel: (416) 736-5358
Fax: (416) 736-5731


David E. Harry, David Zaitlin, Paul J. Marini, and Kent M. Reed. 2003 A first-generation map of the turkey genome. Genome, 46(5): 879-889.

Dr. David E. Harry | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht ‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans
24.10.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für marine Mikrobiologie

nachricht Calcium Induces Chronic Lung Infections
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Oasis of life in the ice-covered central Arctic

24.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans

24.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

24.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>