Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Turkey genome research may help producers breed a better turkey

02.10.2003


To the average person, the turkey genome may seem to be a lot of "gobbledygook." But a just-published study in the journal, Genome, will help to ensure that the turkey that we "gobble down" at our Thanksgiving feasts will be a bird that is truly best of breed.



For the first time, researchers from the University of Minnesota and Nicholas Turkey Breeding Farms in California have collaborated to produce the first genome map, or genetic blueprint, of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

In order to decode the genome, researchers first had to collect and separate the DNA. They then applied chemical processes to the samples to enable them to identify the sequences, or ordering, of the building blocks of the DNA. These building blocks are the four different kinds of bases (adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine) that "spell" out the genetic code within the DNA of each species.


To date, a number of studies have succeeded at mapping the chicken genome, but the turkey remained one of the few domestic food animals for which a genome map was not available.

These maps are essential for applying results from genomics projects in model organisms, humans and other agricultural species. The study entitled "A first-generation map of the turkey genome" that is being published in Genome, a journal of the NRC Research Press, will leverage information from the chicken genome so that it can be more efficiently used to breed a better turkey.

Research into the genetic mapping of domestic animals is aimed at identifying specific genetic sequences that could affect traits of economic importance, such as efficient production, increased reproduction or disease resistance.

Dr. David Harry explains, "Finding a way to breed a turkey with naturally occurring beneficial traits is clearly of interest to the poultry-producing industry. Using naturally occurring variations, it is possible build a better turkey – for example one that expresses a natural genetic resistance to certain diseases. This will enable producers to minimize the cost and potential risks of preventive medications required to safely produce the animals that are being bred for human consumption."



Genome is published by the NRC Research Press, which is the publishing arm of the Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI), an Institute of the National Research Council Canada (NRC).

The full article can be accessed online at: http://pubs.nrc.gc.ca/cgi-bin/rp/rp2_tocs_e?gen_gen5-03_46

For more information, please contact:

Dr. David E. Harry
Genetic Foundations
P.O. Box 3897
Napa, CA 94558
Tel: (707) 287-7890
Fax: (707) 257-8326
E-mail: deharry@ix.netcom.com

Peter Moens
Department of Biology
York University
4700 Keele St.
North York ON M3J 1P3
Tel: (416) 736-5358
Fax: (416) 736-5731
E-mail: genome@yorku.ca

References

David E. Harry, David Zaitlin, Paul J. Marini, and Kent M. Reed. 2003 A first-generation map of the turkey genome. Genome, 46(5): 879-889.

Dr. David E. Harry | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://pubs.nrc.gc.ca/cgi-bin/rp/rp2_tocs_e?gen_gen5-03_46

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progression
22.08.2017 | Umea University

nachricht When fish swim in the holodeck
22.08.2017 | University of Vienna

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular volume control

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

When fish swim in the holodeck

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progression

22.08.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>