Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Circadian influence in plants more widespread than previously thought

02.07.2003


While picking apart the genetic makeup of the plant Arabidopsis, two Dartmouth researchers made a startling discovery. They found that approximately 36 percent of its genome is potentially regulated by the circadian clock, which is three and a half times more than had previously been estimated.



The study, which appears in the June issue of Plant Physiology, was conducted by C. Robertson McClung, Dartmouth professor of biological sciences, and Todd Michael, a former Dartmouth graduate student who is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif. Their research on circadian-controlled genes contributes to efforts to help improve plant productivity and can possibly lead to growing crops that are more resistant to stressful soil or climate conditions.

McClung and Michael used a technique called "gene trapping" or "enhancer trapping" to measure how much mRNA is produced or synthesized by large sections in the genome. According to McClung, a great deal of gene regulation occurs in the gene’s ability to synthesize mRNA, which then is translated into proteins that perform the critical metabolic activities of a cell.


In this study, the researchers randomly inserted a gene that encodes an easily measurable element, in this case luciferase (the enzyme that makes fireflies glow), into the genome to see what genes would be involved in mRNA synthesis. Luciferase is only expressed when it is inserted adjacent to an active plant gene, and it takes on that native gene’s expression. With this method the researchers found new regions of the genome under circadian control.

"In terms of clock control of mRNA synthesis, it does appear that it’s more widespread than we had estimated," says McClung. "It runs contrary to accepted dogma. It’s a new look at this from a slightly different perspective and it gives a slightly different answer. I think our study points out some of the limitations of microarray analysis."

Previous comprehensive genetic studies utilized microarray analysis and had only measured about 10% of the mRNAs in the organism showing circadian oscillations. Microarray studies look at the total abundance of mRNA, including both synthesis and degradation. McClung and Michael’s measurements focus specifically on the rate of mRNA synthesis.

Questions still remain about the discrepancy between the number of genes whose mRNA synthesis is clock regulated and the number whose mRNA abundance exhibits circadian oscillations.

"The answer might lie with the stability of mRNA; if it’s too stable, then the rhythms disappear because the vast majority of the mRNA persists, leading to a pattern of apparent continuous accumulation," says McClung. "It’s also possible that we picked up orphan circadian elements that aren’t actually regulating anything."

Sue Knapp | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.dartmouth.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion
26.07.2017 | Penn State

nachricht New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
26.07.2017 | Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>