Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists develop new RNAi knockdown technology

02.06.2003


Scientists from the RIKEN Tsukuba Institute (Japan) have developed a valuable new experimental system for tissue-specific RNAi knockdown in mammalian cells and organisms – a discovery that will markedly advance the functional characterization of genes involved in development and disease.



Discovered in the late nineties, RNA intereference (RNAi) refers to the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into a cell, where it induces the degradation of complementary mRNA, and thereby suppresses gene expression. RNAi has proven to be a powerful tool in the elucidation of gene function in organisms ranging from worms, to plants and fruit flies.

However, the use of RNAi in mammals has been complicated by the antiviral response of mammalian cells to dsRNA. The presence of foreign dsRNA in a mammalian cell initiates the so-called "interferon response:" the non-specific degradation of mRNA, and ensuing death of the cell. Mammalian RNAi researchers have undertaken a few different routes to avoid eliciting the interferon response, and while some have been successful, none have been able to accomplish it in a tissue-specific manner. Until now.


As published in the June 1 issue of Genes & Development, Dr. Shunsuke Ishii and colleagues have constructed a new RNAi vector (a vehicle to introduce foreign RNA into a cell), which both side steps the interferon response and allows for the tissue-specific suppression of gene expression. This vector, called pDECAP, represents a dramatic improvement over current RNAi transgenic technology.

As Dr. Ishii explains, "In the RNAi transgenic systems developed so far, small hairpin-type RNA is expressed from the RNA polymerase III promoter or the virus promoter. However, these systems cannot be utilized to knockdown gene function in a tissue-specific manner, because these promoters are active in all types of cells. In our system, the RNA polymerase II promoter is utilized to express hairpin-type double-strand RNA (dsRNA). Therefore, our system can be used to generate the tissue-specific knockdown mice."

The pDECAP vector expresses dsRNA from an RNA polymerase II promoter, which can be actived in specific cell types. Therefore, Dr. Ishii and colleagues can pick and choose which tissues that they want to knockdown gene function in. To avoid the interferon response, Dr. Ishii and colleagues engineered the vector to transcribe dsRNA that lacks the sequences needed to export it from the nucleus into the cytosol. Instead, pDECAP-expressed dsRNA is sequestered in the nucleus, where it is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). These siRNAs are then released into the cytosol, where they direct the degradation of target mRNA without eliciting the interferon response.

Dr. Ishii and colleagues used the pDECAP system to suppress expression of the Ski oncogene in mice. These Ski-knockdown mice largely recapitulate the mutant phenotype of traditional Ski-knockout mice (in which the Ski gene has been deleted through homologous recombination of embryonic stem cells), suggesting that Dr. Ishii’s new system provides an efficient alternative to traditional mouse knockouts in the exploration of gene function.

Heather Cosel | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.cshl.org/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Not of Divided Mind
19.01.2017 | Hertie-Institut für klinische Hirnforschung (HIH)

nachricht CRISPR meets single-cell sequencing in new screening method
19.01.2017 | CeMM Forschungszentrum für Molekulare Medizin der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New Study Will Help Find the Best Locations for Thermal Power Stations in Iceland

19.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Not of Divided Mind

19.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Molecule flash mob

19.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>