Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cellular pathway includes a ’clock’ that steers gene activity

08.11.2002


Understanding the timed messages within cells could lead to new medical treatments



Researchers from The Johns Hopkins University and other institutions have discovered a biochemical "clock" that appears to play a crucial role in the way information is sent from the surface of a cell to its nucleus. These messages can cause the cell to thrive or commit suicide, and manipulating them could lead to new treatments for cancer and other diseases, the researchers say.

The findings, based on lab experiments conducted at Cal Tech and computer models developed at Johns Hopkins, are reported in the Nov. 8 issue of the journal "Science."


Scientists have known that living cells send messages from their surfaces to their nuclei by setting off a chain of chemical reactions that pass the information along like signals traveling over a telephone wire. Such reaction chains are called signaling pathways. But while studying one such reaction chain called the NF-kappaB pathway within mouse cells, the university researchers learned that the signal transmission process is even more complicated.

"We found that if the pathway was activated for a short time, a single pulse of activity was delivered to the nucleus, like a single tick of a clock, activating a set of genes," said Andre Levchenko, assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins. "But longer activation could produce more pulses and induce a larger gene set. We believe that the timing between pulses is critical. If too much or too little time elapsed, the genetic machinery would not respond properly."

Levchenko, a lead author on the "Science" paper, and his colleagues concluded that the signaling pathway inside a cell was serving as much more than a simple wire. "It was not just carrying the information, it was processing it," he said. "The pathway was operating like a clock with a pendulum, delivering the signal at particular intervals of time in a way that could resonate with the behavior of the genes in the nucleus."

When information moves through a cell pathway to genes in the nucleus, it prompts the genes to send out their own instructions, directing the cell to assemble proteins to carry out various tasks. By developing a better understanding of the way information travels along a pathway, Levchenko said, researchers may be able to create drugs that disrupt or change this line of communication, and in turn affect overall functioning within the cell. For example, a drug designed to shut down the NF-kappaB pathway might cause a cancer cell to commit suicide through a biological process called apoptosis. "We know that cancer cells use this pathway," he said. "If we can find a smart way to cut this ’wire,’ it will be much easier to kill the cancer cells."

Levchenko and his colleagues made their discovery by first developing a computer model showing how they believed the pathway operates. Then they verified their results by studying live cells in the lab. Finally, they used the validated model to guide further experiments. Although mouse cells called fibroblasts were used, Levchenko said the findings should also hold true for human fibroblasts and other cell types.

Because the computer model has been validated, it could be used to speed up the development of pharmaceuticals that might affect the cell pathway, said Levchenko, who is a part of a computational biology research team based at the Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Institute at Johns Hopkins. He said drug developers could use the computer model to quickly test how various compounds may affect the cell behavior before launching more time-consuming lab tests with live cells. "This has given us a very good tool to predict things that may happen when the pathway properties are altered, reducing the need to engage in exhaustive animal tests," Levchenko said.


The other lead author of the Science paper was Alexander Hoffman, who engaged in the research as a postdoctoral scholar at Cal Tech and now is an assistant professor of biology at the University of California, San Diego. The co-authors were Martin L. Scott, who conducted research at MIT and who now is employed by Biogen Inc.; and David Baltimore, president of Cal Tech.

Color Image of Andre Levchenko available; Contact Phil Sneiderman Related Links:

Andre Levchenko’s Web page: http://www.bme.jhu.edu/~alev
Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering: http://www.bme.jhu.edu

THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
OFFICE OF NEWS AND INFORMATION
3003 N. Charles Street, Suite 100
Baltimore, Maryland 21218-3843
Phone: (410) 516-7160 / Fax (410) 516-5251


Phil Sneiderman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhu.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New switch decides between genome repair and death of cells
27.09.2016 | University of Cologne - Universität zu Köln

nachricht A blue stoplight to prevent runaway photosynthesis
27.09.2016 | National Institute for Basic Biology

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of light metals.
Scientists at the University of Stuttgart have now developed two new process variants that will considerably expand the areas of application for friction stir welding.
Technologie-Lizenz-Büro (TLB) GmbH supports the University of Stuttgart in patenting and marketing its innovations.

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of...

Im Focus: First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source

Optical quantum computers can revolutionize computer technology. A team of researchers led by scientists from Münster University and KIT now succeeded in putting a quantum optical experimental set-up onto a chip. In doing so, they have met one of the requirements for making it possible to use photonic circuits for optical quantum computers.

Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow’s computer technology – whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast...

Im Focus: OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

“Augmented-reality” and “wearables” have become terms we encounter almost daily. Both can make daily life a little simpler and provide valuable assistance for...

Im Focus: Artificial Intelligence Helps in the Discovery of New Materials

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. They report on their findings in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Elpasolite is a glassy, transparent, shiny and soft mineral with a cubic crystal structure. First discovered in El Paso County (Colorado, USA), it can also be...

Im Focus: Complex hardmetal tools out of the 3D printer

For the first time, Fraunhofer IKTS shows additively manufactured hardmetal tools at WorldPM 2016 in Hamburg. Mechanical, chemical as well as a high heat resistance and extreme hardness are required from tools that are used in mechanical and automotive engineering or in plastics and building materials industry. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS in Dresden managed the production of complex hardmetal tools via 3D printing in a quality that are in no way inferior to conventionally produced high-performance tools.

Fraunhofer IKTS counts decades of proven expertise in the development of hardmetals. To date, reliable cutting, drilling, pressing and stamping tools made of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

European Health Forum Gastein 2016 kicks off today

28.09.2016 | Event News

Laser use for neurosurgery and biofabrication - LaserForum 2016 focuses on medical technology

27.09.2016 | Event News

Experts from industry and academia discuss the future mobile telecommunications standard 5G

23.09.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

New imaging technique in Alzheimer’s disease - opens up possibilities for new drug development

28.09.2016 | Medical Engineering

Innovate coating extends the life of materials for industrial use

28.09.2016 | Materials Sciences

Blockchain Set to Transform the Financial Services Market

28.09.2016 | Business and Finance

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>