Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sex-pheromone link to insect evolution

11.09.2002


Cornell University entomologists have unlocked an evolutionary secret to how insects evolve into new species. The discovery has major implications for the control of insect populations through disruption of mating, suggesting that over time current eradication methods could become ineffective, similar to the way insects develop pesticide resistance.



The researchers, led by Wendell L. Roelofs, the Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor of Insect Biochemistry at Cornell, made the discovery while examining ways to keep European corn borers from mating, multiplying and then chewing up farmers’ fields. They discovered the existence of a previously undetected gene, the delta-14, that can regulate the attractant chemicals produced in sex-pheromone glands of female borers. The gene can be suddenly switched on, changing the pheromone components that females use to attract males for mating.

The entomologists have demonstrated that insects evolve chemical systems in leaps rather than in minute stages, as had been previously assumed. The researchers also discovered that there are rare males in the corn borer population -- about 1 in 200 -- capable of responding to chemicals produced by the delta-14 gene.


"This is one way that insects become new species," says Roelofs, whose paper, "Evolution of moth sex pheromones via ancestral genes," will be published on the web site of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (Sept. 9-15, 2002.) The Cornell co-authors on the paper are: Weitian Liu, research associate in entomology; Guixia Hao, postdoctoral researcher in entomology; Hongmei Jiao, laboratory technician in entomology; and Charles E. Linn Jr., senior research associate in entomology. Alejandro P. Rooney, Mississippi State University assistant professor in biological sciences also contributed to the paper. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and will continue to be funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Research Initiative.Roelofs explains that female insects attract males with specialized pheromones that he compares to radio frequencies. At major events with thousands of people, for instance, police might communicate on channel one, emergency medical personnel on channel two and administrators on channel three.

"With male and female borers, it’s the same thing," says Roelofs. "Certain species communicate on channel one, others on channel two, others on channel three. But when a female has a mutated delta-14 gene -- and by mutated I mean the gene is turned on -- it changes her channel from three to five. That means that out of 200 male borers, 199 cannot respond to her. It’s the one male borer capable of responding to her very selective channel that sets out to mate."

Soon other females with the delta-14 gene mate with other rare respondent males. Eventually, over time, the males and females stabilize their pheromone communication system, essentially isolating this new population from the parent species. "That’s one way species evolve," Roelofs says.

Manipulation of insect chemistry is an effective pest control strategy in that it can be used to disrupt mating behavior. For more than 20 years, Roelofs’ research at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva has focused on chemical analyses of the pheromone components. Agricultural researchers have identified pheromones in over 1,000 species of insects and use them to monitor pest populations in 250 species and to disrupt mating in more than 20 species, Roelofs says.

This new research has implications for pest control. In addition to explaining how pheromone evolution might have occurred in the past, the paper also demonstrates that the conditions required for dramatic shifts in pheromone blends could well be present today and in the future. Insect populations could be capable of shifting away from a pheromone blend being used for their control in the field, making such control ineffective.

"Based on the difficulty of generating even small changes in pheromone blends in the lab, we thought that such resistance could not develop because natural pressure would prevent the species from gradually shifting to a different blend," says Roelofs. The presence of this kind of gene, capable of sudden activation, might provide a mechanism for resistance to occur, although no evidence for this has been found so far, he notes.

Roelofs expects this discovery to stimulate more research in this area, specifically to determine the breadth of the phenomenon and how it affects the evolution of many insect communication systems. His research team will be working on the genomes of fruit flies, mosquitoes, crickets and silkworms to detect if these kinds of genes are present.

Blaine P. Friedlander, Jr. | Cornell University News Service

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Complementing conventional antibiotics
24.05.2018 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)
23.05.2018 | Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

First chip-scale broadband optical system that can sense molecules in the mid-IR

24.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Beyond the limits of conventional electronics: stable organic molecular nanowires

24.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

These could revolutionize the world

24.05.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>