Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers Confirm Benzene-like Electron Delocalization

23.06.2008
Researchers in the lab of University of Oregon chemist Shih-Yuan Liu have successfully synthesized and structurally characterized boron-nitrogen compounds that are isoelectronic and isostructural to the fundamentally important benzene molecule.

Given the appearance of benzene derivatives in biomedical research and materials science, the boron-nitrogen substituted analogues could potentially play a pivotal role in these areas.

In the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Liu's team reports that, by using a structural approach, benzene surrogates known as 1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborines possess electron-delocalized structures consistent with aromaticity -- a core concept in chemistry. The paper already has drawn praise by other researchers in a story in this week's Chemical & Engineering News.

"The bottom line is that we have synthesized reference compounds designed to be non-aromatic, and through the comparisons of the aromatic molecule with the reference compounds, we were able to unambiguously say that this compound is really electron delocalized in a way consistent with aromaticity," Liu said. "With the results of other research in this field, our findings present a very strong case that 1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborines are indeed aromatic."

... more about:
»Benzene »Liu

Liu is among molecule-making chemists who are interested in manipulating heterocycles -- ring-like structures that contain various elements in addition to carbon. Aromatic heterocycles play a big role in pharmaceuticals, Liu said, noting that eight of the top ten selling molecules on the market today contain aromatic compounds.

For biomedical purposes, Liu said, boron-containing molecules disguised with other components readily accepted by living tissues could conceivably be used as markers to track the location of the drug. Eventually, he said, targeted drug therapies might deliver very specific tumor-destroying action that leaves healthy cells untouched.

"Our objective is really to first develop the synthetic chemistry of these boron-nitrogen heterocycles, make it accessible to other chemists to study, and ultimately go into applied research to create opportunities in cancer therapies and materials sciences," Liu said. "I believe that we have made substantial progress for expanding the scope of accessible molecules such as this. The methods we have developed here at the University of Oregon are beginning to be quite useful."

Co-authors on the paper were lead author Eric R. Abbey, a doctoral student, and Lev N. Zakharov, director of the X-Ray Diffraction Lab in the UO's Center for Advanced Materials Characterization in Oregon (CAMCOR). The research was funded in part by the National Science Foundation.

About the University of Oregon
The University of Oregon is a world-class teaching and research institution and Oregon's flagship public university. The UO is a member of the Association of American Universities (AAU), an organization made up of 62 of the leading public and private research institutions in the United States and Canada. Membership in the AAU is by invitation only. The University of Oregon is one of only two AAU members in the Pacific Northwest.

Source: Shih-Yuan Liu, assistant professor of chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, 541-346-5573; lsy@uoregon.edu

Links: Shih-Yuan Liu's faculty page: http://www.uoregon.edu/~chem/liu.html; CAMCOR Web site: http://materialscience.uoregon.edu/Outreach/CAMCOR/About.html; College of Arts and Sciences: http://cas.uoregon.edu/

Jim Barlow | newswise
Further information:
http://www.uoregon.edu/~chem/liu.html

Further reports about: Benzene Liu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds
26.05.2017 | Cornell University

nachricht How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system
26.05.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>