Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A Computerized Digital Imaging Technique to Estimate Palm Oil Quality Based on Fruit Colour

16.06.2008
Typically, palm oil quality is determined in a destructive manner using wet chemical analysis, which can be costly, time consuming and error prone.

Here, researchers developed an automated technique of estimating quality based on fruit colour captured in JPEG format.

This research has won the following awards:
GOLD— British Invention Show (BIS 2007).
GOLD— International Invention Innovation Industrial Design & Technology Exhibition (I-TEX 2007).

SILVER— UPM Invention, Research & Innovation Exhibition (PRPI 2006).

... more about:
»Color »DOBI »Digital

To see the Figures described in this write-up, please download the attached document.

TITLE: A Computerized Digital Imaging Technique to Estimate Palm Oil Quality Based on Fruit Colour

RESEARCHERS: Siva K Balasundram, Ahmad Husni Mohd Hanif* and Anuar Abdul Rahim

Typically, palm oil quality is determined in a destructive manner using wet chemical analysis. Such an analysis can be costly, time consuming and error prone. Deterioration of Bleachability Index (DOBI) is a key indicator of palm oil quality. An alternative evaluation procedure that combines consistency and reporting accuracy is desirable. One such method is the use of fruit color as an indicator of palm oil quality.

A recent study showed that fruit color was significantly correlated with palm oil content (Balasundram et al., 2006a). An extension of that work further showed that fruit color was also significantly correlated with DOBI (Balasundram et al., 2006b). Both these studies employed a digital imaging approach to quantify fruit color. Oil palm fruit images were captured using a high resolution digital camera. After imaging, the fruits were manually squeezed for oil and analyzed for total oil content and DOBI using standard laboratory procedures. The images were processed using ILWIS 3.2, an image analysis program, to generate percentage of color based on clustering and unsupervised classification. Each classified image was re-colored to its original color separation, which comprised black, red, orange and yellow components (Figure1). Correlation and stepwise regression techniques were used to determine the relationship between oil content/DOBI and fruit color components.

In this research, we developed an automated technique of quantifying fruit color components based on digital images captured in Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format. This technique is based on a simple computer program written in Visual Basics and interfaced with ILWIS 3.2 (Figure 2). Using the empirical relationship between oil content/DOBI and fruit color, an additional step of estimating % total oil content and/or DOBI values is also made possible. Essentially, the digital fruit image (in JPEG format) serves as the input data to churn out two levels of output sets, i.e., the percentage of color components (black, red, orange and yellow) and the predicted oil content and/or DOBI value.

This technique offers a non-destructive means of assessing palm oil quality and can enable oil yield and/or oil quality mapping to facilitate precision oil palm management. Currently, there is no practical method of mapping oil palm yields/quality due to logistical and instrumentation limitations.

For inquiries, please contact:

Siva K Balasundram
Department of Agriculture Technology
Faculty of Agriculture
Universiti Putra Malaysia
43400 UPM Serdang
Selangor, Malaysia
Tel: +603-8946 4186
Email: siva@agri.upm.edu.my

Dr Nayan Kanwal | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.upm.edu.my
http://www.researchsea.com/html/download.php/id/93/research/UPM-Palm-oil-quality.doc

Further reports about: Color DOBI Digital

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Research team of the HAW Hamburg reanimated ancestral microbe from the depth of the earth
01.03.2017 | Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften Hamburg

nachricht Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells
01.03.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A better way to measure the stiffness of cancer cells

01.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Exploring the mysteries of supercooled water

01.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Research team of the HAW Hamburg reanimated ancestral microbe from the depth of the earth

01.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>