Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Brucella abortus S19 genome sequenced; points toward virulence genes

09.06.2008
Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech and the National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa, and collaborators at 454 Life Sciences of Branford, Conn., have sequenced the genome of Brucella abortus strain S19.

Strain S19 is a naturally occurring strain of B. abortus that does not cause disease and was discovered by Dr. John Buck in 1923. It has been used for more than six decades as vaccine that protects cattle against brucellosis, an infectious disease caused by other strains of B. abortus that leads to reproductive failure in livestock.

Scientists have long wanted to know what genetic features make strain S19 suitable for use as a vaccine in cattle because it may hold the secret as to why other Brucella strains cause disease and trigger the abortion of developing embryos in livestock. The researchers have discovered a group of 24 genes that are linked to virulence by making comparisons of the newly available S19 genome sequence to previously sequenced genomes of two virulent strains of B. abortus. The paper "Genome sequence of Brucella abortus vaccine strain S19 compared to virulent strains yields candidate virulence genes" was published recently in PLoS One (May 2008, Volume 3, Issue 5, e2193).

Oswald Crasta, project director at VBI's Cyberinfrastructure Group and the corresponding author on the paper, remarked: "We have been able to leverage rapid sequencing of the S19 genome on the Roche GS-20™ and GS-FLX™ platforms, and comparative genomics narrowed down the search for Brucella virulence factors to a small group of genes. Of particular interest are four genes that show consistently large sequence differences in S19 compared with two fully sequenced virulent strains." He added: "Further studies are underway to characterize the short list of protein differences that appear to be involved in cellular processes ranging from lipid transport and metabolism to transcription and protein transport. We believe that this characterization will explain why strain S19 has been such a successful vaccine over the years and why infection with other strains leads to disease."

... more about:
»Brucella »GS-FLX™ »Genome »Roche »S19 »VBI »Vaccine »abortus »genes »sequenced »virulence

The initial sequencing was performed on the Roche GS-20™ at 454 Life Sciences, and subsequently repeated after the installation of the Roche GS-FLX™ in the VBI Core Laboratory Facility. Additional traditional sequencing methods were used in VBI's Core Laboratory Facility to completely finish the S19 genome sequence. Clive Evans, Associate Director of the Core Laboratory Facility at VBI, remarked: "The S19 sequence was the first bacterial genome sequenced at VBI with the new Roche GS-FLX™, which was installed in January 2007. The Roche GS-FLX™ sequence allowed us to verify and improve the original sequence, and reduced the number of gaps that needed to be covered with traditional sequencing methods. We were very pleased with the performance of the Roche GS-FLX™."

Bruno Sobral, Executive and Scientific Director of VBI and co-author, remarked: "The complete genome sequence of strain S19 helps us understand the causal molecular agents of brucellosis." He remarked: "Brucella is able to pass from animals to humans with relative ease and poses a significant public health burden for workers in the livestock industry. It is also a possible agent for agricultural, civilian and military bioterrorism. This emphasizes the need for researchers to have a handle on the genetic makeup of the different Brucella strains."

Barry Whyte | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.vbi.vt.edu

Further reports about: Brucella GS-FLX™ Genome Roche S19 VBI Vaccine abortus genes sequenced virulence

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion
26.07.2017 | Penn State

nachricht New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
26.07.2017 | Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>