Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mature B cells reprogrammed to stem-cell-like state

21.04.2008
Fully differentiated cells, can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells

Fully mature, differentiated B cells can be reprogrammed to an embryonic-stem-cell-like state, without the use of an egg according to a study published in the April 18 issue of Cell.

In previous research, induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells have been created from fibroblasts, a specific type of skin cells that may differentiate into other types of skin cells. Because there is no way to tell if the fibroblasts were fully differentiated, the cells used in earlier experiments may have been less differentiated and therefore easier to convert to the embryonic-stem-cell-like state of IPS cells.

B cells are immune cells that can bind to specific antigens, such as proteins from bacteria, viruses or microorganisms. Unlike fibroblasts, mature B cells have a specific part of their DNA cut out as a final maturation step. “Once that piece of DNA is cut out, it can’t come back,” says Jacob Hanna, first author on the paper and a postdoctoral fellow in Whitehead Member Rudolf Jaenisch’s lab. “Checking the genome give us a way to make sure the resulting IPS cells were not from immature cells.”

Hanna and his colleagues began the experiment by generating IPS cells from immature B cells. Similar to the process used to create IPS cells from fibroblast cells, Hanna successfully reprogrammed the immature B cells into IPS cells by using retroviruses to transfer four genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) into the cells’ DNA.

However, an additional factor, CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-á (C/EBPá), was needed to nudge mature B cells to be reprogrammed as IPS cells.

Like IPS cells from earlier fibroblast studies, the IPS cells from both the mature and immature B cells could be used to create mice. The mice grown from the reprogrammed mature B cells were missing the same part of their DNA as the mature B cells, demonstrating that Hanna and his colleagues had successfully reprogrammed fully differentiated cells.

In addition to demonstrating the power of reprogramming, this work offers the promise of powerful new mouse models for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, in which the body attacks certain types of its own cells. For example, mature B or T cells specific for nerve cells called glia could be reprogrammed to IPS cells and then used to create mice with an entire immune system that is primed to only attack the glia cells, thereby creating a mouse model for studying multiple sclerosis.

Eventually, researchers will be able to study diseases by following a similar process with human cells, predicts Jaenisch, who is also a professor of biology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “In principle, this will allow you to transfer a complex genetic human disease into a Petri dish, and study it,” he says. “That could be the first step to analyze the disease and to define a therapy.”

Cristin Carr | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wi.mit.edu

Further reports about: B cells DNA Fibroblast IPS differentiated immature reprogrammed

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Polymers Based on Boron?
18.01.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production
18.01.2018 | Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Polymers Based on Boron?

18.01.2018 | Life Sciences

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

18.01.2018 | Life Sciences

World’s oldest known oxygen oasis discovered

18.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>