Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

3-D images – cordless and any time

17.04.2008
The car tires have left deep tracks in the muddy forest floor at the scene of the crime. The forensic experts make a plaster cast of the print, so that it can later be compared with the tire profiles of suspects’ cars.

There will soon be an easier way of doing it: The police officers will only need to pick up a 3-D sensor, press a button as on a camera, and a few seconds later they will see a three-dimensional image of the tire track on their laptop computer.

The sensor is no larger than a shoebox and weighs only about a kilogram – which means it is easy to handle even on outdoor missions such as in the forest. No cable drums are needed: The sensor radios the data to the computer via WLAN, and draws its power from batteries.

The sensor was developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF in Jena. “It consists of two cameras with a projector in the center,” says IOF head of department Dr. Gunther Notni. “The two cameras provide a three-dimensional view, rather like two eyes. The projector casts a pattern of stripes on the objects. The geometry of the measured object can be deduced from the deformation of the stripes.”

... more about:
»Device »Sensor »stripe

This type of stripe projection is already an established method. What is new about the measuring device named ‘Kolibri CORDLESS’ are its measuring speed, size, weight, and cordless operation. For comparison, conventional devices of this type weigh about four or five times as much and are more than twice the size, or roughly 50 centimeters long. “The reason it can be so much smaller is because of the projector, which produces light with light-emitting diodes instead of the usual halogen lamps,” says Notni. This poses an additional challenge, as the LEDs shine in all directions. To ensure that the image is nevertheless bright enough, the light has to be collected with special micro-optics in such a way that it impacts on the lens.

There are multiple applications: “Patients who snore often need a breathing mask when they sleep. To ensure that the mask is not too tight, it has to be specially made for each patient. Our system enables the doctor to scan the patient’s face in just a few seconds and have the breathing mask made to match these data,” says the researcher.

Notni believes that the most important application is for quality assurance in production processes. The portable device also makes it possible to measure installed components and zones that are difficult to access, such as the position of foot pedals inside a car. The researchers will be presenting their development at the Control trade fair in Stuttgart on April 21 through 25 (Hall 1, Stand 1520).

Monika Weiner | alfa
Further information:
http://www.fraunhofer.de/EN/press/pi/2008/04/ResearchNews42008Topic3.jsp

Further reports about: Device Sensor stripe

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells
19.02.2018 | Biophysical Society

nachricht Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease
19.02.2018 | University of Cambridge

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin display

19.02.2018 | Information Technology

Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?

19.02.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>