Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fraud attempt in a paternity test modifies action protocol in DNA tests

08.04.2008
  • Detection of a fraud attempt in sample taking for a DNA analysis is modifying forensic scientists’ action protocol: It will be compulsory for the donor to wash his mouth out before a witness.
  • The fraud attempt took place in a paternity test, when the donor mixed his own saliva with that of someone else’s.
  • The case has been described in a paper published for the American Academy of Forensic Sciences journal.
Researchers from all over the world have been carrying out paternity tests regularly. Samples are usually collected from mouth and saliva cells to carry out the DNA analysis.

The team of Dr José Antonio Lorente Acosta (director of the Laboratory of Genetic Identification of the University of Granada) carries out these forensic studies commissioned by the court in cases of paternity tests, for the identification of possible criminals or to carry out DNA databases (such as in the case of missing relatives).

The detection of a fraud attempts in a paternity test case in 2007 is changing the action protocol of forensic teams in similar cases. The team of Dr Lorente encountered a strange case: “the saliva analysis (epithelial cells from the interior of mouth) collected from a person undergoing a paternity test gave an incongruous result, a DNA which could not come from the man who had carried out the test”.

The revision of the case revealed that they had followed the usual procedure: the suspect washed his mouth and after that they took the samples with a cotton swab. “After repeating the analysis, there was an only one possible conclusion: In the mouth of that man there was DNA from two different persons”.

After dismissing other possibilities, the question was: how was it possible? “We arranged to meet the person in question, we showed him the result and we explained him that we suspected that he had manipulated the samples which, as it was a trial in judicial investigation, could bring him serious consequences. Faced wit the evidence, he admitted that, shortly before the sample taking, he put into his mouth some saliva he kept in a little container”.
It was n attempt to evade the responsibility in a case of extramarital paternity demand, and “he admitted that, when he mixed his saliva with someone else’s, he attempted to "mislead" the experts in forensic genetics and, through them, the judge. After repeating the test it was revealed (with a probability of more than 99, 999998%) that he was the biological father in that case of judicial investigation”.

Consequences
The referred case gains a special importance as this is the first time it has been described that someone has mixed two types of saliva in order to alter a DNA test; manipulation attempts in blood samples had been described before (with transfusions antes before the sample taking, for example).

“We must highlight –points out Lorente- that the alteration of DNA tests is almost impossible without forensic experts realizing it, but this case aroused the interest of the scientific community after its publication in the journal of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. The reason is obvious: It raises the need of adopting special measures to prevent experts’ error leading to crime or fraud or lack of punishment. From this publication, many protocols of saliva taking for forensic analysis (cases of paternity, crime suspects, and DNA databases) include the obligation for saliva donors to wash their mouth out with water before a witness, just before he places the swab in his mouth to collect saliva samples”.

This case was studied by FBI experts (USA), interested in preventing possible manipulation attempts of the tests, and one of them, Dr Bruce Budowle, is co-author of the work.

SCIENTIFIC REFERENCE:
Authors: MARTÍNEZ-GONZALEZ LJ, LORENTE JA, MARTINEZ-ESPIN E, ALVAREZ JC, LORENTE M, VILLANUEVA E, BUDOWLE B.
Title: Intentional Mixed Buccal Cell Reference Sample in a Paternity Case. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 52:397-399. Year: 2007

Reference: Prof Jose A. Lorente Acosta. Director of the Laboratory for Genetic Identification. Director of the Centre of Human Genomics and Ontology. University of Granada. jlorente@ugr.es

Martinez-Gonzalez | University of Granada
Further information:
http://www.ugr.es

Further reports about: DNA Protocol action forensic paternity saliva

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Topologische Quantenchemie
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

nachricht Topological Quantum Chemistry
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>