Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Systems biology approach identifies nutrient regulation of biological clock in plants

18.03.2008
Using a systems biological analysis of genome-scale data from the model plant Arabidopsis, an international team of researchers identified that the master gene controlling the biological clock is sensitive to nutrient status.

The study will appear in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This hypothesis derived from multi-network analysis of Arabidopsis genomic data, and validated experimentally, has shed light on how nutrients affect the molecular networks controlling plant growth and development in response to nutrient sensing.

The study was conducted by a team of researchers at New York University’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, Chile’s Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Dartmouth College, and Cold Spring Harbor Labs. The study’s lead authors are Rodrigo A. Gutiérrez of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and Gloria Coruzzi of NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology. They note that the systems biology approach to uncovering nutrient regulated gene networks provides new targets for engineering traits in plants of agronomic interest such as increased nitrogen use efficiency, which could lead to reduced fertilizer cost and lowering ground water contamination by nitrates.

Scientists have previously studied how nitrogen nutrients affect gene expression as a way to understand the mechanisms that control plant growth and development. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient and a metabolic signal that is sensed and converted, resulting in the control of gene expression in plants. In addition, nitrate has been shown to serve as a signal for the control of gene expression in Arabidopsis, the first flowering plant to have its entire genome sequenced. There is existing evidence, on a gene-by-gene basis, that products of nitrogen assimilation, the amino acids glutamate (Glu) or glutamine (Gln), might serve as signals of organic nitrogen status that are sensed and in turn regulate gene expression.

... more about:
»Arabidopsis »Expression »Organic »nitrogen »nutrient

To identify genome-wide responses to such organic nitrogen signals, the researchers treated Arabidopsis seedlings with inorganic nitrogen (N) in both the presence and the absence of chemicals that inhibit the assimilation into organic N and conducted a genome-wide analysis of all genes whose expression responds to inorganic or organic forms of nitrogen. Using an integrated network model of molecular interactions for Arabidopsis--constructed by the researchers--in which approximately 7,000 genes are connected by 230,000 molecular interactions, they uncovered a sub-network of genes regulated by organic nitrogen that includes a highly connected network “hub” CCA1, which controls a plant’s biological clock, and target genes involved in nitrogen assimilation.

The findings thus provide evidence that plant nutrition, like animal nutrition, is tightly linked to circadian, or biological clock, functions as scientists have previously hypothesized. Other researchers have recently found that the central clock gene Per2 is necessary for food anticipation in mice. This study indicates that nitrogen nutrition affects CCA1, the central clock gene of plants, suggesting nutritional regulation of the biological clock occurs in plants.

James Devitt | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nyu.edu

Further reports about: Arabidopsis Expression Organic nitrogen nutrient

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation
24.05.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht Carcinogenic soot particles from GDI engines
24.05.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>