Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bioenergy­-For What and How Much? Now in Russian and in English!

26.02.2008
How far can bioenergy go in the energy systems of tomorrow? How much bioenergy can we extract from forests and farm fields, and what should it be used for? What incentives and regulations are necessary to increase the use of biofuels? What contradictions are there between increased biofuel production and other environmental goals? These and other questions are addressed in the Formas pocket book Bioenergy­-For What and How Much?

"Bioenergy is one of the hottest environmental and energy issues in the world today," says Rolf Annerberg, director general of the Swedish Research Council Formas. "We have therefore had Bioenergy­-For What and How Much? translated into both Russian and English."

The use of bioenergy is rising dramatically around the world. In Sweden bioenergy is a major resource. Prime Minister Göran Persson's Oil Commission found that Sweden could double its use of bioenergy by 2050. But is this realistic? And what's happening in other countries?

Globally speaking, there is not enough bioenergy to replace fossil fuels, according to three scientists from Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, in the chapter "Biomass­A Scarce Resource in a Global Perspective." Several authors stress that land is a limiting factor and that we must take into consideration the energy benefits extracted per hectare.

"Invest in radical technological change, not biofuels," write two researchers from Umeå University in Sweden. They provide a historical review of international energy developments.

Which bioenergy systems should we commit to? A scientist from Lund University in Sweden maintains that it is difficult to generalize, but that forest fuels and energy forests are efficient in terms of energy, the environment, and costs. What's more, energy combinations appear to be efficient, where we can produce many different things at the same time, including heat, electricity, and vehicle fuel.

A researcher from Mid Sweden University writes that with today's technology it is more efficient for the climate to produce heat and electricity than fuel from biomass. But new technology is in the pipeline that will improve the climate efficiency of this fuel.

Today the trend is to shift from oil dependency to alcohol dependency when it comes to fuels, according to a researcher from Chalmers. We run the risk of committing ourselves too much to technologies and systems that are not optimal in the long run. He points out that a thousand large-scale and efficient bioenergy facilities would be needed to replace all fossil fuels in the EU.

Other chapters in the book deal with issues like the trade-off between bioenergy and food production, global trade with biofuels, fertilizing and biotechnology to increase the yield of raw materials from forests, various incentives and regulations to increase the production of biofuels, the varying degrees of greenhouse-gas neutrality in biofuels, and how increased biofuel production squares with the preservation of biological diversity.

The book targets decision-makers, the general public, and students in upper-secondary school and up.

For more information about the book and its authors, please contact www.formas.se The book costs SEK 51 (c. EUR 6 or USD 6.70) and can be ordered at www.formas.se or in bookstores. For review copies, please contact lena.jansson@formas.se, phone: +46 (0)8-775 40 65

For more information, please contact: Birgitta Johansson, the Swedish Research Council Formas, birgitta.johansson@formas.se; Emilie von Essen, the Swedish Research Council Formas, eve@formas.se Reference link: www.formas.se

Emilie von Essen | idw
Further information:
http://www.formas.se
http://www.vr.se

Further reports about: Bioenergy­-For Biofuel Efficient Formas Fuel Production bioenergy

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria
23.05.2017 | Rice University

nachricht Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine
23.05.2017 | University of California - Los Angeles

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>