Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Animated Movie of Ice

07.01.2008
Melting ice crystals in a computer animation

An animated movie shows an ordered structure dissolving little by little into a disordered mess after a light pulse: Swedish researchers from the University of Uppsala have used a computer to simulate ice melting after it is heated with a short light pulse.

As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the absorbed energy first causes the OH bonds to oscillate. After a few picoseconds (10-12 s) the energy is converted into rotational and translational energy, which causes the crystal to melt, though crystalline domains remain visible for quite a while.

The common form of ice crystals is known as hexagonal ice. In this form the oxygen atoms of the water molecules are arranged in a tetrahedral lattice. Each water molecule is bound to four neighboring molecules by means of bridging hydrogen bonds, leading to an average of two bridges per molecule. In water, there are, on average, only 1.75 bridging hydrogen bonds per molecule.

... more about:
»Melting »PuLSE »crystalline »picosecond

What happens in the process of melting? Carl Caleman and David van der Spoel have now successfully used a computer to simulate “snapshots” of melting ice crystals. These molecular dynamics simulations are ideal for gaining a better understanding of processes like melting or freezing because they make it possible to simultaneously describe both the structure and the dynamics of a system with atomic resolution and with a time resolution in the femtosecond (10-15 s) range.

The simulation demonstrated that the energy of the laser pulse initially causes the OH bonds in the water molecules to vibrate. Immediately after the pulse, the vibrational energy reaches a maximum. After about a picosecond, most of the vibrational energy has been transformed into rotational energy. The molecules begin to spin out of their positions within the crystal, breaking the bridging hydrogen bonds. After about 3 to 6 picoseconds, the rotations diminish in favor of translational motion.

The molecules are now able to move freely and the crystal structure collapses. This process starts out locally, at individual locations within the crystal. Once the symmetry of the structure is broken, the likelihood of melting processes occurring in the area immediately surrounding the crystal defect rises significantly. The melting process thus spreads out from this point little by little. At other locations the ice can maintain its crystalline structure a little longer.

A movie is available online at http://xray.bmc.uu.se/molbiophys/images/Movies/melt.mpg

Author: David van der Spoel, Uppsala University (Sweden), mailto:spoel@xray.bmc.uu.se

Title: Picosecond Melting of Ice by an Infrared Laser Pulse: A Simulation Study

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, doi: 10.1002/anie.200703987

David van der Spoel | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org
http://xray.bmc.uu.se/molbiophys/images/Movies/melt.mpg

Further reports about: Melting PuLSE crystalline picosecond

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Biofuel produced by microalgae
28.02.2017 | Tokyo Institute of Technology

nachricht Decoding the genome's cryptic language
27.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies

28.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery

28.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>