Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Raman pixel by pixel

09.08.2013
New data processing protocol enables feature-based recognition of Surface-enhanced Raman spectra for intracellular molecule probing of biological targets. It relies on locally detecting the most relevant spectra to retrieve all data independently through indexing.

Raman spectroscopy provides molecular specificity through spectrally-resolved measurement of the inelastic scattering under monochromatic excitation. In the context of microscopy, it may serve as label-free cell imaging, providing structural information.



However, the very low cross-section of Raman scattering requires long time exposures, which preclude imaging of cellular components with low concentrations. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which relies on the local electromagnetic field enhancement produced by metallic nanostructures, is an approach to drastically increase the sensitivity of the Raman detection while retaining large amounts of spectral information.

In cellular imaging, the measurement is usually performed on endocytosed nanostructures. However, the measured SERS signals vary strongly as they depend on excitation beam profile, local particle presence or aggregation and local molecular environment. Identifying and extracting spectra corresponding to molecules of interest within a SERS data set is very difficult.

Conventional data analysis methods look for global patterns in the data, whereas the singlemolecule sensitivity of SERS can detect independent molecules in each pixel with little correlation between pixels. Nicolas Pavillon and his colleagues from Osaka University now explored different algorithmic methods to automatically discriminate spectra of interest in the measured field of view, without imposing assumptions on the self-similarity of the data.

The proposed method relies on the indexing of the positions of relevant spectra, which are selected by the computation of a quality map. The scientists proposed various criteria to compute spectra extraction, such as the spectral energy, the peak count per spectra, or the projection coefficients on SVD vectors. They assessed each criteria with simulated data and applied this approach to different types of measurements, such as dried Rhodamine 6G adsorbed on gold nanoparticles deposited on a glass substrate, and HeLa cells with endocytosed gold nanoparticles.

The tests with simulated data showed that various criteria can provide satisfactory results. The computation time could be tremendously decreased by discarding irrelevant pixels through a simple criterion based on the spectral energy, reducing the processing time to typically less than 10 seconds for a field of view on the order of 100 X 100 pixels. The tests performed on Rhodamine 6G measurements demonstrated the validity of the proposed approach, where its known spectrum could be extracted automatically.

The peak count criterion was the most suitable for most cases, as it detects various patterns without filtering out any curve which may only appear a single instance in the data set. Such single spectra may be critical important in a given SERS detection experiment. One main feature of the proposed approach is that its output is a localization map of the most relevant spectra in a measurement. The spatial information is retained, making it possible to trace back the positions of several spectra with identical properties, for instance. The optimized method was utilized to extract and classify the complex SERS response behavior of gold nanoparticles taken in live cells. (Text contributed by K. Maedefessel-Herrmann)

N. Pavillon, K. Bando, K. Fujita, N. I. Smith, Feature-based recognition of Surface-enhanced Raman spectra for biological targets, J. Biophotonics 6(8),587-597 (2013); doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201200181

For more information about the Journal of Biophotonics visit the journal homepage.

Regina Hagen
Journal Publishing Manager, Journal of Biophotonics
Managing Editor, Physical Sciences
Global Research
Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
Rotherstrasse 21
10245 Berlin
Germany
www.wiley.com
T +49 (0)30 47 031 321
F +49 (0)30 47 031 399
jbp@wiley.com
www.biophotonics-journal.org
www.wileyonlinelibrary.com

Regina Hagen | Wiley-VCH
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com

Further reports about: Biophotonics Raman spectroscopy SERS gold nanoparticle rhodamine

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New technique unveils 'matrix' inside tissues and tumors
29.06.2017 | University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

nachricht Designed proteins to treat muscular dystrophy
29.06.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making Waves

Computer scientists use wave packet theory to develop realistic, detailed water wave simulations in real time. Their results will be presented at this year’s SIGGRAPH conference.

Think about the last time you were at a lake, river, or the ocean. Remember the ripples of the water, the waves crashing against the rocks, the wake following...

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nanostructures taste the rainbow

29.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technique unveils 'matrix' inside tissues and tumors

29.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways

29.06.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>