Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Quick and easy: new ELISA for plant virus detection yields results after two hours

23.06.2016

Scientists at the Leibniz Institute DSMZ have developed an extremely timesaving immunoassay variant. Using the classic ELISA, results are obtained only after up to two days. However, the new ‘B-Fast ELISA’ yields reliable results already after about two hours. Nevertheless, the B-Fast ELISA equals the classic methods with regard to sensitivity, specificity and the possibility of semi-quantitative analysis. At the moment, the DSMZ offers the B-Fast ELISA for the detection of ten different plant viruses, for example the Tomato spotted wilt virus or the Maize chlorotic mottle virus, which belong to the economically most important viruses worldwide.

The plant virologists Dr. Wulf Menzel and Dr. Stephan Winter from the Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures have developed a simplified, much faster variant of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of plant viruses, thereby cooperating with the Australian biotechnology company TGR BioSciences.

Using the classic ELISA, results are obtained only after up to two days. However, the new ‘B-Fast ELISA’ yields reliable results already after about two hours.

“Our rapid test comprises much fewer steps and much shorter incubation times than the classic ELISA variants used up to now, so that the amount of work is considerably reduced,” Wulf Menzel explains. “Nevertheless, the B-Fast ELISA equals the classic methods with regard to sensitivity, specificity and the possibility of semi-quantitative analysis”.

The available kit contains 12 separate 8-well strips, so that low sample numbers can be tested without having to use an entire plate. “Thus, this ‘Friday afternoon ELISA’ is very convenient if the results are needed within a short time or if low sample numbers have to be tested frequently,” Wulf Menzel says.

The ELISA is the commonly used method for the routine detection of plant viruses. The new B-Fast ELISA variant, which is now available in plant pathogen diagnostics for the first time, is based on a technology developed by TGR BioSciences (CaptSure™ technology).

Its special feature is the coupling of the primary antibody with a peptide which can bind to another antibody immobilized on the ELISA plate. Thus, the incubation of primary and secondary antibody together with the sample can occur at the same time on the plate, and the entire complex is immobilized. After a washing step, detection by an enzymatic color reaction takes place.

At the moment, the DSMZ offers the B-Fast ELISA for the detection of ten different plant viruses, for example the Tomato spotted wilt virus or the Maize chlorotic mottle virus, which belong to the economically most important viruses worldwide. Moreover, the scientists are working on the expansion of the method in cooperation with TGR BioSciences, so that more viruses can be detected in the future.

Scientific contact
Dr. Wulf Menzel
Department plant viruses
Phone: 0531 2616-402
E-Mail: plantvirus@dsmz.de

About Leibniz Institute DSMZ
The Leibniz Institute DSMZ – German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH is a Leibniz Association institution. Offering comprehensive scientific services and a wide range of biological materials it has been a partner for research and industry organizations worldwide for decades. DSMZ is one of the largest biological resource centers of its kind to be compliant with the internationally recognized quality norm ISO 9001:2008. As a patent depository, DSMZ currently offers the only option in Germany of accepting biological materials according to the requirements of the Budapest Treaty. The second major function of DSMZ, in addition to its scientific services, is its collection-related research. The Brunswick (Braunschweig), Germany, based collection has existed for 42 years and holds more than 52,000 cultures and biomaterials. DSMZ is the most diverse collection worldwide: In addition to fungi, yeasts, bacteria, and archea, it is home to human and animal cell cultures, plant viruses, and plan cell cultures that are archived and studied there. http://www.dsmz.de

Christian Engel | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: BioSciences Cell DSMZ biological materials cell cultures plant virus viruses

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen
23.02.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Atomic Design by Water
23.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>