Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Four new psoriasis 'hotspots' identified by U-M geneticists

19.10.2010
Discovery may aid in developing new therapies

Scientists at the University of Michigan Heath System and their collaborators have found four new DNA "hotspots" that may one day help guide new treatments for psoriasis, one of the most common autoimmune diseases in the country.

Using cutting-edge methods to peer into the hidden genetic underpinnings of the disabling and disfiguring disease, the research, published in Nature Genetics, further maps the as-yet unknown territories of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

The findings could lead to new drug targets and tailored treatments for the skin disease, says James T. Elder, M.D., Ph.D., the Kirk D. Wuepper Professor of Molecular Genetic Dermatology and lead investigator on the study, which included researchers from the Department of Dermatology and School of Public Health.

"This is a hot topic in genetics these days," Elder says. "Even when you add up all the genes that have been found around the world so far, they only account for about 40 percent of the genetic liability to psoriasis. The question among geneticists continues to be, 'Where is the dark matter?' "

The new research builds on past work by the U-M team, whose discoveries have helped to unveil the hereditary factors of the disease and provide scientists with a better understanding of psoriasis' relationship to other autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

So far, research worldwide has linked 25 genes to psoriasis, which has a strong hereditary component. Including the new discoveries, Elder's team was involved in finding more than half of them.

Two of the four new susceptibility loci – or "hotspots" – were strongly linked to psoriatic arthritis, a painful and destructive form of arthritis that affects about 1 in 4 psoriasis patients, Elder says.

The roughly 7.5 million Americans with psoriasis also have a higher risk of dying from related cardiovascular problems.

Once a full catalog of psoriasis genes has been identified, scientists hope to generate a "psoriasis gene profile" that can predict one's risk of developing the disease and pave the way for innovative treatments. Current treatments, including different types of immunosuppressive agents, aren't always effective and can cause serious side effects – though a new drug called Stelara (ustekinumab), which targets one of the genes they discovered, has been giving patients months-long relief, Elder says.

U-M Professor of Biostatistics Goncalo R. Abecasis, D. Phil, was instrumental in designing software and statistical methods to analyze more than 6 million genetic variants from more than 4,000 people.

"It was a pretty daunting task," Abecasis says. "We looked in greater detail at genetic variation than is typical so that we can understand the biology behind psoriasis and build better drugs."

Methodology: The U-M led, multi-center, international study analyzed data from two recent psoriasis genome-wide association studies involving more than 4,300 individuals, with and without the disease. Those findings were followed up in a three-stage replication study involving more than 8,700 people. The newly identified loci include one at NOS2, one at FBXL19, one near PSMA6-NFKBIA, and one near TRAF3IP2. U-M led the research in the discovery of three of the loci. The TRAF3IP2 locus was reported in a second paper to be published in the same issue of Nature Genetics, in which Elder's collaborators from the University of Kiel in Germany took a leading role.

Additional authors: Philip E. Stuart, Rajan P. Nair, Trilokraj Tejasvi, Johann E. Gudjonsson, Jun Ding, Yun Li, Robert Ike, John J. Voorhees, University of Michigan; Eva Ellinghaus, Andre Franke, University of Kiel, Germany; Stephan Weidinger, Bernadette Eberlein, University of Munich, Germany; Christian Gieger, H. Erich Wichmann, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Germany; Manfred Kunz, University of Lübeck, Germany; Gerald G. Krueger, University of Utah; Anne M. Bowcock, Washington University at St. Louis; Ulrich Mrowietz, Michael Weichenthal, University of Kiel, Germany; Henry W. Lim, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit; Proton Rahman, Memorial University (Canada); Dafna D.Gladman, University of Toronto, Canada.

Funding: The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, German Ministry of Education and Research, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Disclosure: U-M has filed for patent protection and is actively engaged in finding a commercial partner who can help bring the developments to market.

Reference: Nature Genetics, published online Oct. 17, 2010. Print publication pending.

Resources:

Psoriasis Genetics Study at U-M,
https://www.derm.med.umich.edu/home.html
U-M Department of Dermatology,
http://www.med.umich.edu/derm/index.shtml
National Psoriasis Foundation,
http://www.psoriasis.org/

Ian Demsky | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.umich.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Bare bones: Making bones transparent
27.04.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Link Discovered between Immune System, Brain Structure and Memory
26.04.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

27.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

27.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>