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Protein Attributed to Membrane Repair Identified - Mechanism May Revolutionize Therapy in Human Disease

04.12.2008
Researchers at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have identified the protein MG53, as a key initiator of membrane repair in damaged tissue.

The study, released today in Nature Cell Biology, is the first to specifically pinpoint a protein responsible for promoting cell repair.

Led by Jianjie Ma, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, the discovery has the potential to be used as a therapeutic mechanism to repair tissue in humans, transforming treatment for patients who suffer from severe complications of disease and aging. This work was performed in collaboration with Professor Hiroshi Takeshima at Kyoto University, Japan.

“Membrane repair and remodeling is an essential process that maintains cell integrity and mediates efficient cellular function,” said Dr. Ma. “Our research shows that the protein MG53 initiates the repair mechanism in damaged tissue. Through further study, we hope to determine if MG53 can be used as a treatment in repairing human tissue that is damaged by common health conditions, including cardiovascular disease and aging.”

According to Dr. Ma, human cells are continuously injured and naturally repaired through the life span, such as micro tears caused as muscles contract within the body during normal everyday activities. However, diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, muscular dystrophy, and even aging compromise the method in which the body repairs its own tissues, resulting in severe damage. The identification of MG53 provides hope that scientists can create therapies to treat or even prevent this damage. Through further research, Dr. Ma will study the potential for creating therapies for burn treatment, repairing sports injuries and peripheral wounds resulting from diabetes.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture of Japan and the American Heart Association.

UMDNJ-ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON MEDICAL SCHOOL
As one of the nation’s leading comprehensive medical schools, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey is dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in education, research, health care delivery, and the promotion of community health. In cooperation with Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, the medical school’s principal affiliate, they comprise New Jersey’s premier academic medical center. In addition, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has 34 hospital affiliates and ambulatory care sites throughout the region.

As one of the eight schools of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey with 2,500 full-time and volunteer faculty, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School encompasses 22 basic science and clinical departments and hosts centers and institutes including The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the Child Health Institute of New Jersey, the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, and the Stem Cell Institute of New Jersey. The medical school maintains educational programs at the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate levels for more than 1,500 students on its campuses in New Brunswick, Piscataway, and Camden, and provides continuing education courses for health care professionals and community education programs.

Jennifer Forbes | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.umdnj.edu

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