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‘Prepped’ by tumor cells, lymphatic cells encourage breast cancer cells to spread

03.09.2014

HIV drug plus blood vessel growth-blockers could halt metastasis

Breast cancer cells can lay the groundwork for their own spread throughout the body by coaxing cells within lymphatic vessels to send out tumor-welcoming signals, according to a new report by Johns Hopkins scientists.

Writing in the Sept. 2 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe animal and cell-culture experiments that show increased levels of so-called signaling molecules released by breast cancer cells. These molecules cause lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in the lungs and lymph nodes to produce proteins called CCL5 and VEGF. CCL5 attracts tumor cells to the lungs and lymph nodes, and VEGF increases the number of blood vessels and makes them more porous, allowing tumor cells to metastasize and infiltrate the lungs.

In the same report, the researchers say maraviroc, a drug already approved for treating HIV infection, blocked the siren call of CCL5 in tests on animals and cells and prevented tumor spread (metastasis). Additional experiments using a combination of maraviroc and a drug that blocks the VEGF protein suggest that the treatment duo could be an effective way to prevent metastatic disease in human breast cancer patients, according to the researchers.

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»Cancer »Medicine »VEGF »lungs »lymph »lymphatic »metastasis »metastatic

Because the anti-retroviral drug maraviroc has already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and has been shown safe for long term, oral use, it could be tested in clinical trials sooner rather than later, says Aleksander Popel, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

"It was surprising to find that LECs can play such an active and significant role in tumor spread." Popel noted. "Conventionally, lymphatic vessels are regarded mainly as passive conduits through which tumor cells spread from the primary tumor and eventually metastasize," he said. "However, we now know that lymphatic vessels enable metastasis, and other studies also show that they play an important role in whether or not immune cells recognize and attack cancer cells."

Popel and colleagues traced the influence of tumor signaling on LECs in cell cultures and in mice. Breast cancer cells were bathed in a nutrient-rich liquid, and, as the cancer cells grew, the investigators detected secretions of a signaling molecule called interleukin-6 (IL6) in the liquid.

Mice that were injected with the IL6-containing liquid experienced a continual rise in CCL5 levels in blood samples for several weeks. Nine of 10 tumor-bearing mice injected with the IL6-laden liquid developed metastases five weeks later. Only two of 10 mice, exposed to the liquid and given a combination of maraviroc and a VEGF-blocking drug, developed metastases.

Because maraviroc blocks the actions of CCL5, it could be delivered, along with standard chemotherapy, right after surgically removing a tumor in a bid to prevent any leftover circulating tumor cells from finding a new metastatic niche in the body, Popel says.

"However, IL6-secreting tumors could be laying the groundwork for metastasis much earlier than surgery occurs in a patient," he said. "To prevent metastatic sites from taking root, we could administer drugs that block IL6 before surgery."

The study did not address when or how to remove lymph node tissue surgically, as is often done as part of breast cancer treatment, but Popel and colleagues hope to explore the issue in future studies.

###

Other researchers on the paper include Esak Lee, the first author, and Niranjan Pandey of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Elana Fertig, Kideok Jin, and Saraswati Sukumar of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Funding for the study was provided by the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute (R01 CA138264) and the Safeway Foundation for Breast Cancer.

Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM), headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, is a $7 billion integrated global health enterprise and one of the leading academic health care systems in the United States. JHM unites physicians and scientists of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with the organizations, health professionals and facilities of The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System. JHM's vision, "Together, we will deliver the promise of medicine," is supported by its mission to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research and clinical care. Diverse and inclusive, JHM educates medical students, scientists, health care professionals and the public; conducts biomedical research; and provides patient-centered medicine to prevent, diagnose and treat human illness. JHM operates six academic and community hospitals, four suburban health care and surgery centers, and more than 35 Johns Hopkins Community Physicians sites. The Johns Hopkins Hospital, opened in 1889, has been ranked number one in the nation by U.S. News & World Report for 22 years of the survey's 25 year history, most recently in 2013. For more information about Johns Hopkins Medicine, its research, education and clinical programs, and for the latest health, science and research news, visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org

Media Contacts:

Vanessa Wasta, 410-614-2916, wasta@jhmi.edu

Amy Mone, 410-614-2915, amone@jhmi.edu

Vanessa Wasta | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Cancer Medicine VEGF lungs lymph lymphatic metastasis metastatic

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