Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Oncogenic signatures mapped in TCGA a guide for the development of personalized therapy

30.09.2013
Clinical trial design for new cancer therapies has historically been focused on the tissue of origin of a tumor, but a paper from researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center published on September 26 in Nature Genetics supports a new approach: one based on the genomic signature of a tumor rather than the tissue of origin in the body.

It is well known that the emergence of cancer is a multi-step process, but because of the efforts of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), funded by the US National Institutes of Health, and other large-scale cancer genomics efforts, for the first time this process can be viewed in exquisite molecular detail, mapping mutations and other molecular events affecting any of the 20,000 genes in a human cell.

Now, two major hypotheses have been confirmed from the genomic analysis of more than 3000 samples from 12 different tumor types: a limited number of specific genetic events appear to cause most tumor subtypes and tumors can be grouped by the oncogenic signatures they contain, no matter what the tissue of origin. That these oncogenic signatures are largely independent of the particular tissue in which the cancer arises indicates that certain drug combinations may be beneficial for select patients with different types of cancer.

"In future clinical trials, we envision that patients with a certain type of endometrial cancer, for example, may be enrolled in the same trial as patients with a subtype of colorectal cancer, and that patient selection for clinical trials can be guided by cancer genomics profiling in the clinic," stated Chris Sander, one of the principal investigators of Memorial Sloan-Kettering's Genome Data Analysis Center. "This work is intended to help in the design of such trials and the development of more-personalized cancer therapies."

The ability to reveal sets of cancer-causing events in molecular detail is based on three major technical and scientific developments in the last decade. New high-throughput genomic technologies and lower operating costs have enabled the collection of genetic data from many thousands of tumors. The experience and knowledge accumulated in cancer genomics in many laboratories has taught us which of the many molecular alterations in cancer are likely to contribute to oncogenesis. Linking data and knowledge, new algorithms and methods for large data analysis in the field of computational biology provide the ability to find the proverbial needles in the haystack: to derive cancer-causing molecular genetic signatures and link them to tumor subtypes and potential therapies on the background of extremely high levels of informational noise.

The Memorial Sloan-Kettering team and their colleagues in TCGA and the International Cancer Genome Consortium plan to expand these comprehensive analyses to tens of thousands of tumor samples. A glimpse of the molecular tumor landscape in more than 13,000 tumor samples is already accessible in the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics at http://www.cbioportal.org.

Principal authors on the study are Giovanni Ciriello, Nikolaus Schultz, and Chris Sander of the Computational Biology Center at Memorial Sloan-Kettering.

The current research was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute under award number U24 CA143840.

About Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is the world's oldest and largest private cancer center with more than 125 years devoted to exceptional patient care, innovative research, and outstanding educational programs. We are one of 41 National Cancer Institute–designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, with state-of-the-art science flourishing side by side with clinical studies and treatment.

The close collaboration between our physicians and scientists enables us to provide patients with the best care available as we work to discover more-effective strategies to prevent, control, and ultimately cure cancer in the future. Our education programs train future physicians and scientists, and the knowledge and experience they gain at Memorial Sloan-Kettering has an impact on cancer treatment and biomedical research around the world. For more information, go to http://www.mskcc.org.

Caitlin Hool | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mskcc.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

nachricht Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery
20.01.2017 | GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>