Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The nutritional value of Andalusian lupines is revealed

31.08.2009
A group of researchers from the Fat Institute (CSIC) and the University of Seville have confirmed that some wild plants have a high nutritional value. The scientists have found that several species of lupins from the mountains of Andalusia have a protein content similar to that of other cultivated legumes, as they publish in the online version of the Food Chemistry magazine.

Javier Vioque is a scientific researcher from the Fat Institute (CSIC) in Seville. "We have studied the seeds of six species of lupin (Lupinus sp.) in the south of Spain and we believe that they may represent new sources of quality proteins", he explained to SINC.

The cultivated lupin, a legume which is used as cattle fodder (although its grains are also edible if the bitterness is removed with water and salt), belongs to the Lupinus albus species, but the researchers have focused on six other species which grow wild in Andalusia or are cultivated in a marginal manner: Lupinus angustifolius, L. cosentinii, L. gredensis, L. hispanicus, L. luteus and L. micranthus.

Vioque and other colleagues from the Fat Institute and the University of Seville have analyzed the composition of the amino acids which make up the seed proteins, as well as the "protein digestibility" (percentage of protein digested) and other nutritional parameters. The results of the work will be published at the end of the year in the Food Chemistry magazine, although they can already be viewed online.

The data reflect that the species studied display a high protein content fluctuating between 23.8% and 33.6%, very similar to that observed in other legumes. Moreover, the protein digestibility of these lupins is high (between 82% and 89%) and is also similar to that of other legumes and cereals. The study concludes that L. luteus, L. hispanicus and L. cosentinii contain the proteins with the best nutritional properties and that the amino acid composition of the latter species is the most balanced.

Legumes as a source of proteins

Legumes, together with cereals, represent the main source of vegetable proteins in the human diet. The beans and fruits of these plants, as well as having a high content of quality protein, are rich in fibre and carbohydrates and contain other components like polyphenols. For this reason, several studies have confirmed that the consumption of these legumes is beneficial for our health and may help to prevent illnesses such as diabetes and colon cancer.

Despite the above, the consumption of legumes has decreased in recent years, especially that of autochthonous and locally-distributed species. The legumes of the Lupinus species are no exception to the problem.

"For the conservation and expansion of these local crops, we need to continue studying their characteristics as a source of food", indicated Vioque, who emphasizes that research like this "confirms the interest in studying populations of wild species, cultivated or not, so that they can provide seeds with good nutritional properties".

References:

Elena Pastor-Cavada, Rocío Juan, Julio E. Pastor, Manuel Alaiz y Javier Vioque. "Analytical nutritional characteristics of seed proteins in six wild Lupinus species from Southern Spain". Food Chemistry 117 (3): 466-469, 2009.

SINC | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.plataformasinc.es

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays
18.10.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

nachricht Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficient
18.10.2017 | KU Leuven

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>