Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New software helps to find out why “jumping genes” are activated

16.09.2016

Jumping genes, so-called transposons, reproduce as parasites in the genome. This selfish behaviour can be an evolutionary advantage for the organism or harm it. There is still a debate about the factors controlling the activity of transposons. Comparisons between populations could shed an answer on this but have been biased due to technical problems. The software PoPoolationTE2 developed by the Institute of Population Genetics at Vetmeduni Vienna enables an unbiased analysis for the first time and determines the frequency of transposons. This might also be useful for cancer research and neurology. The software was presented in the renowned journals Molecular Biology and Evolution.

The genome is not a fixed code but flexible. It allows changes in the genes. Transposons, however, so-called jumping genes, interpret this flexibility in a much freer way than “normal” genes. They reproduce in the genome and chose their position themselves. Transposons can also jump into a gene and render it inoperative. Thus, they are an important distinguishing mark for the development of different organisms.


Using the new tool PoPoolationTE2 allows for calculating the frequency of transposable elements in Pool-Seq sequencing reactions. (Figure: Robert Kofler/Vetmeduni Vienna)

Unclear what triggers transposon activity

However, it is still unclear how jumping genes developed and what influences their activity. “In order to find out how, for instance, climate zones influence activity, we must be able to compare the frequency of transposons in different populations – in different groups of individuals,” explained bioinformatician Robert Kofler from the Institute of Population Genetics at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna. But this frequency has not yet been determined precisely.

New software for a low-priced method

Transposons are detected by DNA sequencing. But this detection cannot be carried out for every single member of a population. “At the moment, this would go beyond the available resources regarding finance and amount of work. The only – and much cheaper – option is to analyse an entire population in one reaction,” explained last author Christian Schlötterer. This method, which he has established using the example of fruit flies, is called Pool-Seq. It is also routinely applied to detect transposons.

Existing analysis programmes, however, could not provide a precise result in this case. So far, each analysis has been biased by different factors such as the sequencing depth and the distance between paired reads.

For this purpose, Kofler developed the new software PoPoolationTE2. “If we sequence entire populations, each reaction provides a different result. The number of mixed individuals is always the same, but the single individuals differ,” explained Kofler. Furthermore, technical differences in the sample processing, among others, have influenced the analysis so far. PoPoolationTE2 is not affected by these factors. Thus, questions about the activity of transposons can be answered precisely for Pool-Seq reactions.

Interesting for cancer research

“The unbiased detection of transposon abundance enables a low-price comparison of populations from, for instance, different climate zones. In a next step, we can find out if a transposon is very active in a particular climate zone,” said Kofler. In principle, the bioinformatician has developed this new software for Pool-Seq. But as this method is also applied in medical research and diagnosis, the programme is also interesting for cancer research or the detection of neurological changes since transposons also occur in the brain.

Lab experiments confirm influencing factors

Lab experiments can indicate the factors influencing transposons. Last author Schlötterer explained these factors referring to an experiment with fruit flies: “We breed a hundred generations per population and expose them to different stimuli. We sequence at every tenth generation and determine if a stimulus has influenced the activity of the transposons. Thus, we can describe the activity of transposons in fast motion, so to say.” If the abundance is low, the scientists assume that the transposons are only starting to become more frequent. If a transposon reproduces very quickly in a particular population, this is called an invasion. If a jumping gene is detected in an entire population and not in another one, it could have been positively selected.

Service:
The article “PoPoolationTE2: comparative population genomics of transposable elements using Pool-Seq“ by Robert Kofler, Daniel Gómez-Sánchez and Christian Schlötterer was published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.
http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/07/22/molbev.msw137.abstract

About the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna
The University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna in Austria is one of the leading academic and research institutions in the field of Veterinary Sciences in Europe. About 1,300 employees and 2,300 students work on the campus in the north of Vienna which also houses five university clinics and various research sites. Outside of Vienna the university operates Teaching and Research Farms. http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at

Scientific Contact:
Robert Kofler
Institute of Population Genetics
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-4333
robert.kofler@vetmeduni.ac.at

Released by:
Georg Mair
Science Communication / Corporate Communications
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna)
T +43 1 25077-1165
georg.mair@vetmeduni.ac.at

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/en/infoservice/presseinformation/presseinformationen-...

Mag.rer.nat. Georg Mair | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht How brains surrender to sleep
23.06.2017 | IMP - Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pathologie GmbH

nachricht A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation
22.06.2017 | Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>