Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nanoparticles added to platelets double internal injury survival rate

21.08.2012
Results of early lab study hold promise for trauma cases

Nanoparticles tailored to latch onto blood platelets rapidly create healthy clots and nearly double the survival rate in the vital first hour after injury, new research shows.

"We knew an injection of these nanoparticles stopped bleeding faster, but now we know the bleeding is stopped in time to increase survival following trauma," said Erin Lavik, a professor of biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve University and leader of the effort.

The researchers are developing synthetic platelets that first responders and battlefield medics could carry with them to stabilize car crash or roadside bomb victims. An injection could slow or halt internal bleeding until the victim reaches a hospital and receives blood transfusions and surgery.

Lavik spoke about the latest breakthroughs in her research today at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting in Philadelphia.

Lavik and her colleagues began focusing on synthetic platelets after learning the military has no equivalent of a tourniquet, pressure dressing or other easily transportable technology to stem bleeding from internal injuries.

But as they explored possible applications, they recognized that the approach is widely needed beyond military conflict. Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for people age 4 to 44, often overwhelming the body's natural blood-clotting process.

The platelet-like nanoparticles are made of biodegradable polymers used in devices already approved by the Food & Drug Administration for use in humans. They're designed to hone in on injuries after injection. Natural platelets, activated by injury, emit chemicals that bind natural platelets and the additional synthetics into a larger clot faster than natural platelets alone.

Tested on a lethal liver injury model in lab rats, the one-hour survival rate of the models injected with the nanoparticles was 80 percent. For control groups treated with saline alone the survival rate fell to 47 percent, while control groups receiving scrambled nanoparticles totaled just 40 percent. Among the three, the models treated with the platelet-like nanoparticles exhibited the least blood loss.

The researchers also found that the hybrid clots were as firm as natural clots. In additional testing, they found no complications following administration of the nanoparticles.

Earlier tests showed these synthetic platelets can cut bleeding time by as much as half and that, a week later, the rats showed no ill effects from the materials

The researchers include graduate students Andrew J. Shoffstall, Lydia M. Everhart and Margaret M. Lashof-Sullivan; research assistants Kristyn T. Atkins and Rebecca E. Groynom; undergraduate student Matt E. Varley; and administrative assistant Blaine Martin-Dow, all of Case Western Reserve. They are teamed with Robert S. Butler, of the Department of Quantitative Health Services at the Cleveland Clinic, and Jeffrey S. Ustin, assistant professor, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and member of the Department of General Surgery at the Cleveland Clinic.

They are continuing to test the platelets with other models of injury, working toward the best design and dosage for human use.

Kevin Mayhood | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.case.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Watching the orbital angular momentum of plasmons on a nanoscale
17.03.2017 | Universität Duisburg-Essen

nachricht Operation of ancient biological clock uncovered
17.03.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

EGU General Assembly: Meeting programme online, provisional press conference topics

02.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Next-gen steel under the microscope

17.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas

17.03.2017 | Studies and Analyses

New role for immune cells in preventing diabetes and hypertension

17.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>