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Microbe hunters discover long-sought-after iron-munching microbe

24.10.2016

A microbe that ‘eats’ both methane and iron: microbiologists have long suspected its existence, but were not able to find it - until now. Researchers at Radboud University and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen discovered a microorganism that couples the reduction of iron to methane oxidation, and could thus be relevant in controlling greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.

The balance between methane-producing and -consuming processes has a major effect on the worldwide emission of this strong greenhouse gas into our atmosphere.


One oft he bioreactors, in which and his colleagues found the rust-munching microbes.

Boran Kartal

The team of microbiologists and biogeochemists now discovered an archaeon - the other branch of ancient prokaryotes besides bacteria – of the order Methanosarcinales that uses iron to convert methane into carbon dioxide. During that process, reduced iron become available to other bacteria.

Consequently, the microorganism initiates an energy cascade influencing the iron and methane cycle and thus methane emissions, describe first authors Katharina Ettwig (Radboud University) and Baoli Zhu (Hemholtz Zentrum München) in the paper.

Application in wastewater treatment

Besides, these archaea have another trick up their sleeve. They can turn nitrate into ammonium: the favourite food of the famous anammox bacteria that turn ammonium into nitrogen gas without using oxygen. “This is relevant for wastewater treatment”, says Boran Kartal, a microbiologist who recently moved from Radboud University to the Max Planck Institute in Bremen.

“A bioreactor containing anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidizing microorganisms can be used to simultaneously convert ammonium, methane and oxidized nitrogen in wastewater into harmless nitrogen gas and carbon dioxide, which has much lower global warming potential.” The same process could also be important in paddy fields, for example, which account for around one fifth of human-related emissions of methane.

Closer than expected

While there have been numerous indications that such iron-dependent methane oxidizers existed, researchers have never been able to isolate them. Surprisingly, they were right in front of our doorstep: “After years of searching, we found them in our own sample collection”, says microbiologist Mike Jetten of Radboud University with a smile. “We eventually discovered them in enrichment cultures from the Twentekanaal in The Netherlands that we’ve had in our lab for years.”

“Based on the genetic blueprint of these microorganisms”, Kartal adds, “we hypothesized that they could convert particulate iron - basically rust - coupled to methane oxidation. So we tested our hypothesis in the lab – and these organisms did the trick.” In the next step, Kartal wants to look closer into the details of the process. “These findings fill one of the remaining gaps in our understanding of anaerobic methane oxidation. Now we want to further investigate which protein complexes are involved in the process.”

Billions of years ago

The newly discovered process could also lead to new insights into the early history of our planet. Already 4 to 2.5 billion years ago, Methanosarcinales archaea might have abundantly thrived under the methane-rich atmosphere in the ferruginous (iron holding) Archaean oceans,. More information on the metabolism of this organism can therefore shed new light on the long-standing discussion of the role of iron metabolism on early earth.

Original publication
Archaea catalyze iron-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane
Katharina F. Ettwig, Baoli Zhu Daan R. Speth, Jan T. Keltjens, Mike S. M. Jetten, Boran Kartal
PNAS 2016

Participating institutes
Radboud University, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Groundwater Ecology, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA, USA
Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Microbial Physiology Group, Bremen, Germany 


Please direct your queries to …
Dr. Boran Kartal
Phone: +498 421 2028 645
E-Mail: bkartal@mpi-bremen.de

or the press office
Dr. Fanni Aspetsberger
Dr. Manfred Schlösser
Phone: +49 421 2028 704
E-Mail: presse@mpi-bremen.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.mpi-bremen.de

Dr. Fanni Aspetsberger | Max-Planck-Institut für marine Mikrobiologie

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