Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Micro-Patchwork Family

21.02.2014
3D construction: microparticles made of three chemically independent patches

Micromachines, nanorobots, multifunctional drug transporters, and matrices for tissue growth – these and many other applications would benefit from three-dimensional microstructures that present different (bio)chemical ligands that offer control over directionality.



In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of German and American researchers has now reported the production of microparticles whose surface consists of three separate areas (“patches”) that can be decorated with three different (bio)molecules.

“While the spatially controlled presentation of chemical and biological ligands is well established for two-dimensional substrates, very few methodologies exist for the spatially controlled decoration of three-dimensional objects, such as microparticles,” explains Jörg Lahann (University of Michigan, USA and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology). “Such structures would be very useful for many different applications, such as the controlled interaction of particles with biological cells for tissue growth.”

Organs are three-dimensional structures made of different types of cells. The growth of organs requires supports that stimulate the three-dimensionally controlled colonization of these cell types. Future technical applications, such as micromachines, will require 3D particles that can control the self-assembly of three-dimensional structures. If an area can also be made to respond to a stimulus by swelling or shrinking, for example, it would be possible to produce movable miniature components for use in sensors, robotic arms, or switchable drug transporters.

Lahann and his co-workers have now developed a method that allows them to obtain three chemically different patches on the same microparticle. The technique they used is electrohydrodynamic co-jetting, a process in which the researchers pump three different polymer solutions through parallel capillaries. An electric field accelerates the ejected liquid, which stretches it out. The solvent simultaneously evaporates, leaving behind a microfiber consisting of three chemically different compartments. By cutting the fibers, the team produces fine microparticles that are also made of three chemically different segments.

For their starting materials, the researchers chose three biodegradable polymers based on lactic acid. The three polymers were each equipped with a different chemical anchor group (known as “click functionality”).

It was thus possible to attach different ligands, such as different biomolecules, to the anchor groups in an orthogonal fashion, meaning that the surface reactions to attach the ligands do not influence each other. By using biomolecules containing fluorescent markers, the scientists were able to demonstrate by using a microscope that three different patches were indeed present on the same microparticle. “For practical applications the particles need to be just a bit smaller – that is our next goal,” says Lahann.

About the Author
Dr. Lahann is Professor of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan. He also serves as the Director of the Biointerfaces Institute at the University of Michigan and the Co-Director of the Institute for Functional Interfaces at the Karlrsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. He has been selected byTechnology Review as one of the top 100 young innovators and is the recipient of the 2007 Nanoscale Science and Engineering Award as well as a NSF-CAREER award. Since 2011, he has been a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.
Author: Joerg Lahann, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA), http://www.umich.edu/~lahannj/index.htm
Title: Chemically Orthogonal Three-Patch Microparticles
Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201310727

Dr. Lahann | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation
22.06.2017 | Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

nachricht CWRU researchers find a chemical solution to shrink digital data storage
22.06.2017 | Case Western Reserve University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

Im Focus: Optoelectronic Inline Measurement – Accurate to the Nanometer

Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It’s not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products. Since current inline measurement technology not yet provides the required accuracy, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is collaborating with four renowned industry partners in the INSPIRE project to develop inline sensors with a new accuracy class. Funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the project is scheduled to run until the end of 2019.

New Manufacturing Technologies for New Products

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>