Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Marine scientists from Warnemünde succeed in deciphering the microbial world of the Baltic Sea

19.09.2011
….and prove that bacteria do not follow the textbook rules describing the salinity/ diversity relationship of aquatic animals and plants

….and discover the apparently most abundant organism of the Baltic Sea – a bacterium unknown until now.

In a comprehensive measuring campaign, the microbiologists Daniel Herlemann, Matthias Labrenz and Klaus Jürgens, from the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research in Warnemünde, together with Swedish colleagues have succeeded in sampling microorganisms from the entire Baltic Sea, from the southwestern marine Skagerrag to the northern freshwaters of the Bothnian Bay. The respective bacterial communities were analyzed by means of state-of-the-art "high-throughput sequencing technologies." Thus, the Baltic Sea is the first sea in which all of the microbial inhabitants have been completely inventoried.

The results, which were published very recently, are astonishing: unlike the Baltic Sea's fauna and flora, its bacteria are unimpressed by the varying salinity that prevails in the Baltic. Indeed, while many organisms avoid the intermediate salinities (between freshwater and saltwater) that are characteristic of the central Baltic—which explains the minimal diversity under brackish water conditions—bacteria clearly differ in that under these conditions they show a constant species diversity.

Similarly, although typical marine or limnic bacterial assemblages become less diverse beyond the fully marine or limnic margins of the Baltic Sea, bacterial diversity remains high in the brackish water of the Baltic Proper because of the presence of species adapted to these conditions.

Among these, one bacterium was discovered that seems to thrive extraordinarily well in the Baltic Proper: this remarkably abundant organism belongs to the group of Verrucomicrobia, which was previously mainly found in lakes and soils. The function of this newly discovered and highly abundant bacterium is, at the moment, obscure. Moreover, in addition to the lack of cultivated representatives, specific sequences of the closest related isolate of the Verrucomicrobia group and those of the newly discovered organism differ by 12%.

The results support the notion that bacteria are well-equipped to cope with the challenging transitional area between freshwater and saltwater in the Baltic Sea and that, in contrast to higher organisms, there is no decline in their number of species under these conditions. Thus, the rapid and flexible adaptability of bacteria enables them to occupy ecological niches to which higher organisms have only limited access.

The results were published in the article: “Transitions in bacterial communities along the 2000 km salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea” Daniel PR Herlemann, Matthias Labrenz, Klaus Jürgens, Stefan Bertilsson, Joanna J Waniek and Anders F Andersson. The ISME Journal, (published online 7 April 2011) | doi:10.1038/ismej.2011.41

Contact:
Dr. Daniel Herlemann, +49 381 / 5197 209
PD Dr. Matthias Labrenz, +49 381 / 5197 378
Prof. Dr. Klaus Jürgens, +49 381 / 5197 250
Department of Biological Oceanography, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde
or
Dr. Barbara Hentzsch, +49 381 / 5197 102
Directorate / Public Relation, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde

The IOW is member of the Leibniz Association, a network of 87 scientifically, legally and economically independent research institutes and scientific service facilities. Leibniz Institutes perform strategic-and thematically-oriented research and offer scientific services of national significance while striving to provide scientific solutions to major social challenges.

The 16,800 employees of the Leibniz Institutes include 7,800 academics, with 3,300 junior scientists. One indication of the Leibniz Institutes' strong competitiveness and excellence is the 330 million Euros allocated to them from third-party funds. The total budget of all Leibniz Institutes amounts to more than 1.4 billion Euros.

Leibniz Institutes contribute to clusters of excellence in fields such as mathematics, optic technologies, materials research, medicine, climate and environmental research, and bio- and nanotechnology as well as the humanities, economics, and social sciences. They foster close co-operations with universities, industry, and other research institutes, both in Germany and abroad. The Leibniz Association has developed a comprehensive system of quality management in which, at regular intervals, independent experts assess every institute as part of the Association's unique peer review evaluation process.

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch | idw
Further information:
http://www.leibniz-association.eu
http://www.io-warnemuende.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation
24.05.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht Carcinogenic soot particles from GDI engines
24.05.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>