Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mainz University installs a new particle accelerator

05.01.2016

New cyclotron produces radioactive isotopes for nuclear chemistry to be applied in basic research and the development of clinical applications

A new particle accelerator will further enhance the research landscape at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). It is to be employed to conduct research into potential applications of medical relevance. The new cyclotron has been installed in a basement structure of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry on the Gutenberg Campus.


Installation of the cyclotron on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

photo/©: Heinz-Martin Schmidt

It will be used to generate short half-life isotopes, which will be principally used for fundamental research but are also required for the medical imaging technique known as positron emission tomography (PET). The cost of this large-scale research device amounts to about EUR 1 million provided by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Rhineland-Palatinate Research Initiative. Commissioning of the new cyclotron is planned for spring 2016.

The cyclotron is a ring-shaped particle accelerator that occupies a floor space of some 7.5 square meters and has a height of two meters. It weighs about 50 tons and a crane had to be used to lower it through a hole in the ceiling into the designated basement room. In addition to the cyclotron room, the new structure has a technical and control center together with an access lock. The structure is linked directly to the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry extension building and has all safety-relevant features.

As it will be able to accelerate protons to an energy of 9.7 mega-electron volts (MeV), the cyclotron at Mainz University can be used to generate the two radioactive elements fluorine-18 and carbon-11. These will be mainly employed for chemical and pharmaceutical research purposes but are also necessary for the PET medical diagnostic imaging technique.

F-18 and C-11 have short half-lives of just 110 and 20 minutes respectively. It is thus necessary to generate them near the location at which they are to be used to ensure that they are available in sufficient quantities. It has not previously been possible in Mainz to create radiopharmaceuticals labeled with C-11 because of its particularly short half-life. The new accelerator has now made this feasible.

"The cyclotron will enhance our currently existing infrastructure and eliminate a bottleneck in the production of radioactive nuclides," explained Professor Frank Rösch of the JGU Institute of Nuclear Chemistry. "It will significantly facilitate the development of new radiopharmaceuticals and their preclinical evaluation while – working in collaboration with the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Mainz University Medical Center – we will be able to markedly expedite their future application in patient diagnosis."

There are additional benefits to be expected through interdisciplinary joint projects in which the areas of nuclear chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, organic chemistry, and nuclear medicine at JGU will collaborate with regard to the development and evaluation of new PET radiopharmaceuticals, in some cases also with external institutions such as the Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics at RWTH Aachen and the Mainz-based Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research.

Photos:
http://www.uni-mainz.de/bilder_presse/09_kernchemie_zyklotron_einbau_01.jpg
Installation of the cyclotron on the campus of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
photo/©: Heinz-Martin Schmidt

http://www.uni-mainz.de/bilder_presse/09_kernchemie_zyklotron_einbau_02.jpg
Installment of a cyclotron door into the newly constructed cyclotron building
photo/©: Heinz-Martin Schmidt

http://www.uni-mainz.de/bilder_presse/09_kernchemie_zyklotron_einbau_03.jpg
(fltr) Professor Tobias Reich (Managing Director of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry), Professor Norbert Trautmann (Institute of Nuclear Chemistry), Dr. Waltraud Kreutz-Gers (Chancellor of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz), Professor Georg Krausch (President of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz), and Professor Frank Rösch (Institute of Nuclear Chemistry) observing the installation of the new cyclotron
photo/©: Heinz-Martin-Schmidt

Further information
Professor Dr. Frank Rösch
Institute of Nuclear Chemistry
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU)
55099 Mainz, GERMANY
phone +49 6131 39-25302
fax +49 6131 39-24692
e-mail: frank.roesch@uni-mainz.de
http://www.kernchemie.uni-mainz.de/radiopharmazie-roesch/117_ENG_HTML.php

Related links:
http://www.kernchemie.uni-mainz.de – Institute of Nuclear Chemistry
http://www.uni-mainz.de/presse/19663_ENG_HTML.php – press release "German Research Foundation, Rhineland-Palatinate, and Mainz University invest more than
EUR 2 million in a cyclotron and its building complex" (19 October 2015)

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni-mainz.de/presse/20010_ENG_HTML.php - press release ;
http://www.kernchemie.uni-mainz.de/eng/index.php - Institute of Nuclear Chemistry ;
http://www.uni-mainz.de/presse/19663_ENG_HTML.php - press release "German Research Foundation, Rhineland-Palatinate, and Mainz University invest more than EUR 2 million in a cyclotron and its building complex" (19 Oct. 2015)

Petra Giegerich | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Rice University lab runs crowd-sourced competition to create 'big data' diagnostic tools
30.06.2016 | Rice University

nachricht A protein coat helps chromosomes keep their distance
30.06.2016 | IMBA - Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Thousands on one chip: New Method to study Proteins

Since the completion of the human genome an important goal has been to elucidate the function of the now known proteins: a new molecular method enables the investigation of the function for thousands of proteins in parallel. Applying this new method, an international team of researchers with leading participation of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to identify hundreds of previously unknown interactions among proteins.

The human genome and those of most common crops have been decoded for many years. Soon it will be possible to sequence your personal genome for less than 1000...

Im Focus: Optical lenses, hardly larger than a human hair

3D printing enables the smalles complex micro-objectives

3D printing revolutionized the manufacturing of complex shapes in the last few years. Using additive depositing of materials, where individual dots or lines...

Im Focus: Flexible OLED applications arrive

R2D2, a joint project to analyze and development high-TRL processes and technologies for manufacture of flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) has been successfully completed.

In contrast to point light sources like LEDs made of inorganic semiconductor crystals, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are light-emitting surfaces. Their...

Im Focus: Unexpected flexibility found in odorant molecules

High resolution rotational spectroscopy reveals an unprecedented number of conformations of an odorant molecule – a new world record!

In a recent publication in the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter...

Im Focus: 3-D printing produces cartilage from strands of bioink

Strands of cow cartilage substitute for ink in a 3D bioprinting process that may one day create cartilage patches for worn out joints, according to a team of engineers. "Our goal is to create tissue that can be used to replace large amounts of worn out tissue or design patches," said Ibrahim T. Ozbolat, associate professor of engineering science and mechanics. "Those who have osteoarthritis in their joints suffer a lot. We need a new alternative treatment for this."

Cartilage is a good tissue to target for scale-up bioprinting because it is made up of only one cell type and has no blood vessels within the tissue. It is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Quantum technologies to revolutionise 21st century - Nobel Laureates discuss at Lindau

30.06.2016 | Event News

International Conference ‘GEO BON’ Wants to Close Knowledge Gaps in Global Biodiversity

28.06.2016 | Event News

ERES 2016: The largest conference in the European real estate industry

09.06.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Modeling NAFLD with human pluripotent stem cell derived immature hepatocyte like cells

30.06.2016 | Health and Medicine

Rice University lab runs crowd-sourced competition to create 'big data' diagnostic tools

30.06.2016 | Life Sciences

A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction

30.06.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>