Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Low bone mineral density common in children and teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease

23.08.2010
A thesis from the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) is the first in Scandinavia to study the occurrence of low bone mineral density in children and teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease. Half of the patients in the study showed signs of low bone mineral density. The results emphasise the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease more effectively, and of measuring bone mineral density in this group of patients.

Low bone mineral density, or BMD, was evident in around half of the 144 participants with inflammatory bowel disease aged between six and 19 in a major study in western Sweden. Disturbed development of BMD during childhood and adolescence may increase the risk of osteoporosis later in life and thus the likelihood of fractures.

“Possible risk factors for low BMD were more severe disease with increased inflammatory activity in the gut, male gender and low body mass index,” says Susanne Schmidt, researcher at the Institute of Clinical Sciences.
Genetic factors also had a major role to play in the children’s BMD, aside from their chronic gastrointestinal inflammation which itself can affect BMD.

“We investigated the children’s biological parents and measured their BMD,” says Schmidt. “We found a clear correlation between the parents’ and the children’s BMD. Where both parents had a low BMD, a child was six times more likely to have a low BMD too. A similar correlation has previously been described in healthy children and their parents.”

However, the researchers saw that after two years the BMD of the oldest patients was showing signs of recovery, which will be investigated more closely in a follow-up study.

According to Schmidt there have, to date, been neither international nor national guidelines for monitoring BMD in children and teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease. She therefore sees a need to introduce checks on BMD, particularly in those patients with risk factors, such as more active disease, low body mass index or parents with a known low BMD.

“The results of the study also underline the importance of optimising the treatment of these patients to minimise the inflammation which is partly behind the low BMD.”

INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE
Inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, is a group of chronic inflammatory conditions – such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – that affect different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Typical symptoms include loose stools with traces of blood, abdominal pains and poor growth. Almost 1% of the Swedish population has the condition, making it a common complaint, with around a quarter developing it during childhood or the teenage years. IBD has increased significantly over the last few decades among children, both in Sweden and abroad. Around 300 children and teenagers under the age of 18 develop IBD every year in Sweden. It is treated with medicines, surgery and/or nutritional therapy.
For more information, please contact:
Susanne Schmidt, doctor and researcher at the Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, tel +47 941 614 05, e-mail: schm-sus@online.no

Doctoral thesis for the degree of PhD (Medicine) at the Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden).

Title of thesis: Bone mineral density in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://hdl.handle.net/2077/22101
http://www.gu.se/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
27.03.2017 | Lancaster University

nachricht Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain function
27.03.2017 | Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain function

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Weather extremes: Humans likely influence giant airstreams

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>