Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Possible link between immune system and Alzheimer's

15.11.2012
U of T researchers help discover genetic mutation linked to disease
An international research team including scientists from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Medicine has discovered a link between a mutation in an immune system gene and Alzheimer's disease.

Using data from 25,000 people, researchers from the Faculty of Medicine and University College London's Institute of Neurology discovered that a rare genetic mutation in the TREM2 gene — which helps trigger immune system responses — is also associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's. The discovery supports an emerging theory about the role of the immune system in the disease.

"This discovery provides an increasingly firm link between brain inflammation and increased risk for Alzheimer's," says Dr. Peter St George-Hyslop, director of U of T's Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases. "This is an important step towards unraveling the hidden causes of this disease, so that we can develop treatments and interventions to end one of the 21st century's most significant health challenges."

St George-Hyslop, renowned for identifying five genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, says the breakthrough is, "another win for U of T scientists who are building on a worldwide legacy of expertise in neurodegenerative research."

The team began by sequencing the genes of 1,092 people with Alzheimer's and a control group of 1,107 healthy people. The results showed several mutations in the TREM2 gene occurred more frequently in people who had the disease than in those without the disease. One mutation – known as R47H – had a particularly strong association with the disease.

The mutation makes a patient three times more likely to develop the disease, although it affects just 0.3 per cent of the population.

"While the genetic mutation we found is extremely rare, its effect on the immune system is a strong indicator that this system may be a key player in the disease," says Dr. Rita Geurreiro from UCL, the study's lead author.

The study is published now in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Nicole Bodnar | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.utoronto.ca

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Ravens understand the relations among others
23.04.2014 | University of Vienna

nachricht Loss of memory in Alzheimer's mice models reversed through gene therapy
23.04.2014 | Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Siemens at the 2014 UIC ERTMS World Conference in Istanbul

01.04.2014 | Event News

AERA Meeting: German and US-American educational researchers in dialogue

28.03.2014 | Event News

WHS Regional Meeting: International experts address health challenges in Latin America

24.03.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

High-Calorie and Low-Nutrient Foods in Kids' TV

23.04.2014 | Studies and Analyses

A three dimensional biodegradable hydrogel for treating gum diseases

23.04.2014 | Materials Sciences

Malaysian and Taiwanese researchers make major advances in dye sensitized solar cells

23.04.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>