Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Light shed on the secret behind probiotic bacteria promoting health

07.10.2009
Functional food is the food industry's fastest-growing product group, its leading products including dairy products which contain probiotics, that is, bacteria promoting health.

Valio's Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG®) is the most frequently studied and used probiotic. Under the supervision of researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, and the Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences at the University of Helsinki, an international research team determined the genome sequences of LGG and a bacterium closely related to it.

The results, published in the renowned PNAS journal, shed light on the origin of probiotic mechanisms and promote product development in the food industry.

Functional food includes products designed for daily use, which have been shown by clinical studies to have positive health effects. Scientific study results have particularly contributed to the success of dairy products containing probiotic bacteria. Many research publications have confirmed that these bacteria promote health and boosts immune system and improve digestion. Some probiotics can also alleviate the symptoms suffered by those with irritable bowel syndrome. As many as every fifth westerner suffers from this pain, also called spastic colon. Studies say that LGG probiotics are also an effective treatment method for reducing children's atopic symptoms, and the risk of respiratory infections.

In its recent publication, the research team showed that the protein component found by the team has a fundamental role in LGG binding with the human intestinal mucus. The team found out that the surface structures of LGG has a specific adhesion component. Remarkably, the binding feature has been assumed to be one of the most important characteristics of bacteria with health-benefiting effects. Moreover, the researchers assume that the protein structure in question enables the health-promoting effects of LGG and other probiotic bacteria, and the positive immune modulation produced by them.

The research is a prime example of productive co-operation between researchers and the food industry. According to Tuomas Salusjärvi, research manager for Valio, the successful sequencing provides valuable additional information to support the already existing research information. The safety of the LGG probiotic and its advantages to consumers can now be shown in an even better way than before. A significant research field has been established around probiotic bacteria. So far, thousands of scientific articles have been published on the subject. For this line of research, the findings of the genome, and the molecular mechanism possibly behind probiotics, is a downright breakthrough.

The original publication is available online at: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/09/16/0908876106.abstract

The research has been funded by the Academy of Finland, and the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (TEKES).

Additional information:
Matti Kankainen, Researcher
Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, tel. +358 50 398 5987, e-mail: matti.kankainen@helsinki.fi
Tuomas Salusjärvi, Research Manager
Technology and Microbiology, Valio
Tel. 050 384 0072
E-mail: tuomas.salusjarvi@valio.fi
Willem M. de Vos, Professor
Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, University of Helsinki; Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, tel. +31 653 735635, e-mail: willem.devos@wur.nl

Matti Kankainen | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.helsinki.fi

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Ruby: Jacobs University scientists are collaborating in the development of a new type of chocolate
18.09.2017 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

nachricht German scientists question study about plastic-eating caterpillars
15.09.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

IVAM’s LaserForum visits the Swiss canton of St. Gallen with the topic ultrashort pulse lasers

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Robust and functional – surface finishing by suspension spraying

19.09.2017 | Materials Sciences

The Wadden Sea and the Elbe Studied with Zeppelin, Drones and Research Ships

19.09.2017 | Earth Sciences

Digging sensors out of an efficiency hole

19.09.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>