Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Human umbilical stem cells cleared mice's cloudy eyes

09.12.2009
Research will be presented at America Society for Cell Biology conference

Transplanting human stem cells from umbilical cords onto the abnormally thin, cloudy corneas of laboratory mice significantly improved corneal transparency and increased the thickness of the animals' corneal stroma, the transparent middle layer, according to research that will be presented at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 49th Annual Meeting, Dec. 5-9, 2009 in San Diego.

These research results come at a time of limited supply of donated human corneas for treating patients with severe corneal and genetic eye diseases. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UMSCs) transplants may prove to be an alternative to corneal transplant surgeries.

The transplanted UMSCs survived in the mouse corneal stroma for more than three months with minimal signs of graft rejection, Winston Kao, Ph.D., of the University of Cincinnati School of Medicine reported at the ASCB conference.

In contrast, human umbilical hematopoietic stem cells (HUHSCs), the stem cells that give rise to all blood cells types, rapidly vanished from the mouse corneas when they were transplanted into the animals' eyes. Unlike the UMSCs, the HUHSCs were victims of graft-host rejection.

Kao reported that histological and immune fluorescence staining showed that the transplanted UMSCs could trans-differentiate and assume the appearance of normal corneal keratocytes.

The new cells expressed critical keratocyte markers such as keratocan and aldehyde dehydrogenase as well as the adhesion protein, CD34, all with little or no graft reaction.

The animal model for these studies, a special knockout mouse, was genetically engineered to lack the gene for making lumican, a protein essential for the formation and maintenance of a transparent cornea. Knockout mice without lumican have thin and cloudy corneas.

The supply of human corneas for transplantation is under threat from an unexpected direction: laser eye surgery. Reconfiguring the refractive surface of the cornea through laser surgery unfortunately can leave the cornea unsuitable for later organ donation. About 50,000 corneal transplants are performed each year in the U.S.

Having his proof of principle in hand, Kao said that he believes that UMSC transplants as an alternative treatment for severe genetic and corneal diseases are well worth pursuing. Unlike donated corneas, the supply of human UMSCs is almost unlimited, Kao said.

UMSCs are easy to isolate from the umbilical cord, their numbers can be expanded in cell culture, and they can be stored ⎯ and quickly recovered ⎯ from liquid nitrogen when a patient is in urgent need of a clear, healthy cornea.

Kao's research team included scientists at University of California, Irvine, Bionet Incorporated, Taipei, Taiwan, as well as University of Cincinnati School of Medicine.

Winston W-Y Kao, Ph.D. (513-558-2802; Winston.Kao@UC.Edu) will present poster, "Cell Therapy of Corneal Diseases with Umbilical Mesenchymal Stem Cells" on Tuesday, Dec. 8, during the 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Poster Session 3, Program #1694, Board #B73, Exhibit Halls D-H.

Cathy Yarbrough | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ascb.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Programming cells with computer-like logic
27.07.2017 | Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

nachricht Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics
27.07.2017 | Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Programming cells with computer-like logic

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period

27.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>