Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hide and Seek: Revealing Camouflaged Bacteria

17.04.2014

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. The so called interferon-induced GTPases reveal and eliminate the bacterium’s camouflage in the cell, enabling the cell to recognize the pathogen and to render it innocuous. The findings are published in the current issue of the science magazine “Nature”.

Bacteria have developed countless strategies to hide themselves in order to evade attack by the immune system. In the body, Salmonella bacteria use macrophages as host cells to ensure their survival and to be able to spread within the body.


GTPases (green) attack Salmonella typhimurium (red).

(Figure: University of Basel, Biozentrum)

Their survival strategy is to nestle into a vacuole within the cytoplasm of a macrophage, hiding there and multiplying. While they are hidden there, the immune cells cannot detect the bacteria and fight them.

Exposure: GTPases destroy Salmonella’s hideout

The macrophages, in which the Salmonella hide, however, have also developed a strategy to unmask the disguise of the bacterium and uncover its hiding place. Prof. Petr Broz’s research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered a protein family called interferon-induced GTPases in host cells invaded by Salmonella.

“They are responsible for destroying the hiding place of the pathogen and to initiate the immune response of the cell,” explains Etienne Meunier, first author of the publication.

Destruction: Kick-off for attacking the bacteria

Once the hiding place has been discovered, GTPases are transported to the vacuole and destabilize its membrane. The bacteria are left behind unprotected in the cytoplasm where their surface molecules are easily recognized by the intracellular defense.

“The GTPases are the key to the hiding place of the bacteria. Once the door has been opened and the protective vacuole destroyed, there is no escape. The bacteria are immediately exposed to the defense machinery of the cell”, says Meunier. Receptors in the cell identify the pathogen, which then activate special cellular enzymes to destroy the bacteria. In addition, the cells own proteases, so-called caspases, are activated and trigger cell death of the infected host cell.

Salmonella still remain a feared pathogenic agent, as they can cause life threatening diarrheal disease. The findings of Broz and his team enable the better understanding of the strategies of the immune cells and to perhaps model this in the future.

The deeper understanding of the immune response of our cells also paves the way for new approaches in using drugs to support the body’s fight against pathogens. In order to further elucidate the mechanisms of the immune response to Salmonella infections, the research team plans to investigate how cells detect the hiding place of the bacteria, the vacuole in the cytoplasm of the macrophages, and what initiates the recruitment of GTPases to the vacuole.

Original Citation
Etienne Meunier, Mathias S. Dick, Roland F. Dreier, Nura Schürmann, Daniela Kenzelmann Broz, Søren Warming, Merone Roose-Girma, Dirk Bumann, Nobuhiko Kayagaki, Kiyoshi Takeda, Masahiro Yamamoto and Petr Broz
Caspase-11 activation requires lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles by IFN-induced GTPases
Nature (2014); Advance Online Publication | doi: 10.1038/nature13157

Further Information
Prof. Petr Broz, University of Basel, Biozentrum, phone: +41 61 267 23 42, email: petr.broz@unibas.ch

Heike Sacher | Universität Basel
Further information:
http://www.unibas.ch

Further reports about: Biozentrum Salmonella drugs macrophage mechanisms pathogenic protein responsible strategies

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A Map of the Cell’s Power Station
18.08.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht On the way to developing a new active ingredient against chronic infections
18.08.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>