Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Genetic variation cuts bladder cancer risk, protects chromosome tips

04.04.2011
UT MD Anderson scientists also link the same SNP to longer telomeres

A common genetic variation links to both bladder cancer risk and to the length of protective caps found on the ends of chromosomes, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting.

These endings or tips, called telomeres, guard against chromosomal damage and genomic instability that can lead to cancer and other diseases.

"We found a single point of variation in the genome strongly associated with a 19 percent decrease in bladder cancer risk. The same variant also is linked to longer telomeres, which accounts for part of the overall reduction in risk," said first author Jian Gu, Ph.D., assistant professor in MD Anderson's Department of Epidemiology.

Telomere length diminishes with age, Gu said, and short telomeres are associated with age-related diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Previous studies separately tied telomere length either to cancer risk or to genetic variation. The paper by Gu and colleagues is the first to make both connections.

"Understanding the complex genetic regulation of telomere length and its relation to the causes of bladder and other types of cancer will help develop therapies or lifestyle changes to reduce cancer risk," said senior author Xifeng Wu, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of MD Anderson's Department of Epidemiology.

Wu and colleagues in 2003 were the first to show that short telomeres increase the risk of bladder, lung, kidney and head and neck cancers in a human epidemiological study.

Start with 300,000 SNPs

The new findings were presented by Gu at the AACR annual meeting and simultaneously published in Cancer Prevention Research, an AACR journal.

AACR President Elizabeth Blackburn, Ph.D., the Morris Herzstein professor of biology and physiology at the University of California San Francisco, won the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology in 2009 for her role in the discovery of telomeres and the enzyme telomerase. She wrote an editorial in Cancer Prevention Research and appeared with Gu at a news conference Saturday to discuss the importance of the study results.

Researchers first conducted a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variations associated with telomere length. They analyzed more than 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), common points of variation in the genome, in 459 healthy controls.

This narrowed the field to 15,120 SNPs, which were then validated in 1,160 healthy controls in two independent populations. They selected the top four SNPs that were associated with telomere length across all three populations for the bladder cancer association study.

Then there was one

The team evaluated the association of these four sites with the risk of bladder cancer in a case-control study of 969 patients and 946 controls. Only one, a SNP on chromosome 14 known as rs398652, was associated with bladder cancer risk.

Since the SNP was associated with both telomere length and bladder cancer risk, the team conducted a mediation analysis to determine whether the effect on telomere length caused some of the risk reduction. Telomere length accounted for 14 percent of the SNP's effect on bladder cancer.

"We think the remaining portion of the SNP effect on bladder cancer may be caused by inflammation or immune response," Gu said. "But understanding the remainder of the risk will require more basic research." Rs398652 is nearest to a gene on chromosome 14 called PELI2, which is involved in the inflammatory and immune response.

Follow up studies will focus on whether this SNP is associated with other types of cancer, particularly those affected by telomere length such as lung, kidney and esophageal cancer, Gu said, as well as the biological mechanisms by which the SNP affects telomere length.

Grants from the National Cancer Institute funded this research.

Co-authors with Gu and Wu are co-lead author Meng Chen, Ph.D., Sanjay Shete, Ph.D., Christopher Amos, Ph.D., Yuanqing Ye, Ph.D., and Jie Lin, Ph.D., all of the Department of Epidemiology, and Ashish Kamat, M.D., and Colin Dinney, M.D., of MD Anderson's Department of Urology.

About MD Anderson
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston ranks as one of the world's most respected centers focused on cancer patient care, research, education and prevention. MD Anderson is one of only 40 comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute. For seven of the past nine years, including 2010, MD Anderson has ranked No. 1 in cancer care in "America's Best Hospitals," a survey published annually in U.S. News & World Report.

Scott Merville | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mdanderson.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”
05.12.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht The Nagoya Protocol Creates Disadvantages for Many Countries when Applied to Microorganisms
05.12.2016 | Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

High-precision magnetic field sensing

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Construction of practical quantum computers radically simplified

05.12.2016 | Information Technology

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>