Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Genetic Predisposition to Liking Amphetamine Reduces Risk of Schizophrenia and ADHD


Genetic variants associated with enjoying the effects of d-amphetamine—the active ingredient in Adderall—are also associated with a reduced risk for developing schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), report scientists from the University of Chicago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on April 7. The results support a long-standing hypothesis that dopamine, the neurotransmitter connected with the euphoric effects of amphetamine, is related to schizophrenia and ADHD.

“Some of the variants that make you like amphetamine also appear to make you less likely to develop schizophrenia and ADHD,” said study leader Abraham Palmer, PhD, associate professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago. “Our study provides new insights into the biology of amphetamine and how it relates to the biology of risk for these psychiatric diseases.”

Palmer and his team previously conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic variants associated with experiencing the euphoric effects of amphetamine, which is thought to affect risk for drug abuse. Almost 400 volunteers were given d-amphetamine in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment.

They were then asked to report how the drug made them feel using carefully designed questionnaires. The researchers measured genetic differences between these subjects at approximately a million sites throughout the genome to identify variations in the DNA code known as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs. They assessed the relationships between each of these SNPs and sensitivity to amphetamine.

Using data from other large-scale GWAS studies, the team examined these same SNPs for possible overlapping associations with psychiatric disorders. Through rigorous statistical testing they found that an unexpectedly large number of SNPs were associated with both sensitivity to amphetamine and risk of developing schizophrenia or ADHD. This suggested that these traits are influenced by a common set of genetic variants.
Moreover, a significant proportion of this observed overlap appeared to be caused by variants that increased enjoyment of the effects of amphetamine but decreased the risk for both psychiatric diseases.

The researchers performed similar analyses for traits that were not expected to be related to amphetamine sensitivity, such as height, irritable bowel disease and Parkinson’s disease. In all of these cases they observed no more overlapping SNPs than would have been expected by chance alone.

“While this approach would not be a useful diagnostic test, we expect that people who like the effects of amphetamine would be slightly less likely to develop schizophrenia and ADHD,” Palmer said. “And people who did not like amphetamine, we would predict, are slightly more likely to develop these diseases.”

“What is particularly striking is that by examining people’s responses for just a few hours after taking a drug, we can identify an underlying genetic propensity that can manifest as a psychiatric disease over the course of a lifetime,” he adds.

These results provide unique genetic evidence for the role of dopamine in schizophrenia and ADHD. Schizophrenia is commonly treated using drugs that block dopamine signaling, while ADHD is treated using drugs, including d-amphetamine itself, that enhance dopamine signaling. Despite opposite treatments, amphetamine-liking SNPs reduced the risk for developing both diseases, suggesting that dopamine’s role is more complex than hypothesized.

The study also offers a new direction for the analysis of a wide range of similar genetic studies, particularly ones with smaller sample sizes. By analyzing the results of those studies for overlap with data from much larger genetic studies, promising genetic variants that would otherwise never stand out among the noise of hundreds of thousands of other random variants can be identified.

“Our approach offers a promising new direction for studying complex psychiatric behaviors using the whole-genome approach,” said co-author Harriet de Wit, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago.
The team plans to further study the SNPs identified in this study for their functional roles in amphetamine liking, schizophrenia and ADHD. In addition, Palmer hopes to explore genetic predispositions toward liking or disliking other therapeutic drugs and whether sensitivity to those drugs might also overlap with the diseases for which these drugs are used.

“When we use a drug treatment, we know exactly what systems have been perturbed,” Palmer said. “So when we see overlap for alleles that affect how you respond to drugs and a disease, we can hone in on what those alleles are doing biologically. This is instrumental for translating those results into new treatments and cures, which is the ultimate reason for performing genetic studies of disease.”

The study, “Genetic variation associated with euphorigenic effects of d-amphetamine is associated with diminished risk for schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder,” was supported by the National Institutes of Health. Additional authors include Amy B. Hart, Eric R. Gamazon, Barbara E. Engelhardt, Pamela Sklar, Anna K. Kähler, Christina M. Hultman, Patrick F. Sullivan, Benjamin M. Neale, Stephen V. Faraone, Psychiatric Genomics Consortium: ADHD Subgroup and Nancy J. Cox.

Kevin Jiang | newswise
Further information:

Further reports about: ADHD Amphetamine Genetic Risk SNPs develop diseases dopamine drugs schizophrenia sensitivity variants

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular trigger for Cerebral Cavernous Malformation identified
26.11.2015 | EMBO - excellence in life sciences

nachricht Peering into cell structures where neurodiseases emerge
26.11.2015 | University of Delaware

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s

Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fuelled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week.

Scientists say that a major step change, or ‘regime shift’, in the Earth’s biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from...

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaics – from the Lab to the Façade

Fraunhofer ISE Demonstrates New Cell and Module Technologies on its Outer Building Façade

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE has installed 70 photovoltaic modules on the outer façade of one of its lab buildings. The modules were...

Im Focus: Lactate for Brain Energy

Nerve cells cover their high energy demand with glucose and lactate. Scientists of the University of Zurich now provide new support for this. They show for the first time in the intact mouse brain evidence for an exchange of lactate between different brain cells. With this study they were able to confirm a 20-year old hypothesis.

In comparison to other organs, the human brain has the highest energy requirements. The supply of energy for nerve cells and the particular role of lactic acid...

Im Focus: Laser process simulation available as app for first time

In laser material processing, the simulation of processes has made great strides over the past few years. Today, the software can predict relatively well what will happen on the workpiece. Unfortunately, it is also highly complex and requires a lot of computing time. Thanks to clever simplification, experts from Fraunhofer ILT are now able to offer the first-ever simulation software that calculates processes in real time and also runs on tablet computers and smartphones. The fast software enables users to do without expensive experiments and to find optimum process parameters even more effectively.

Before now, the reliable simulation of laser processes was a job for experts. Armed with sophisticated software packages and after many hours on computer...

Im Focus: Quantum Simulation: A Better Understanding of Magnetism

Heidelberg physicists use ultracold atoms to imitate the behaviour of electrons in a solid

Researchers at Heidelberg University have devised a new way to study the phenomenon of magnetism. Using ultracold atoms at near absolute zero, they prepared a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

Fraunhofer’s Urban Futures Conference: 2 days in the city of the future

25.11.2015 | Event News

Gluten oder nicht Gluten? Überempfindlichkeit auf Weizen kann unterschiedliche Ursachen haben

17.11.2015 | Event News

Art Collection Deutsche Börse zeigt Ausstellung „Traces of Disorder“

21.10.2015 | Event News

Latest News

Using sphere packing models to explain the structure of forests

26.11.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Dimensionality transition in a newly created material

26.11.2015 | Materials Sciences

Revealing glacier flow with animated satellite images

26.11.2015 | Earth Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>