Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene variant linked with development of COPD in men

16.05.2011
Researchers have linked a variant in the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) with the onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Caucasian men. The study population consisted of participants in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study, a multidisciplinary study of aging that began in 1963.

The VDR study will be presented at the ATS 2011 International Conference.

"Our results show that this gene variant is associated with development of COPD in Caucasian men, and provides support for the notion that vitamin D metabolic pathways may affect COPD risk," said Audrey Poon, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University Health Centre in Montreal. The study was conducted while Dr. Poon was doing her first postdoctoral fellowship at Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Although cigarette smoking is considered to be the main risk factor for chronic obstructive diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis, only a proportion of smokers develop clinical disease. Researchers believe genetic factors also contribute to the risk of developing COPD. The vitamin D metabolic pathway has been implicated in the development of COPD.

"Several variants of genes that control vitamin D function and metabolism have been associated with COPD and other lung diseases, but results have been conflicting," Dr. Poon said. "In this study we investigated variants in two vitamin D pathway genes and their association with development of COPD."

Using DNA data from the VA study, the researchers determined the genotypes of 24 variants in the vitamin D receptor gene and 12 in the vitamin D binding protein gene in a total of 1,215 men. All subjects were free of known chronic conditions, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, chronic lung disease, asthma and diabetes at the time of recruitment.The VA study also offered data from repeated lung function measures conducted over 40 years, as well as smoking information for the participants.

The researchers used the lung function data to measure the time it took for participants to develop COPD, evaluating all 36 gene variants. They found variant rs3847987 of the VDR gene was found to influence the time to onset of COPD in the study population.

"We had the expectation that we would find an association of variants in one of these genes with the development of COPD," Dr. Poon said. "However, we did not expect that this particular variant in the VDR gene would be associated, since it has not been reported to be associated with COPD before."

Future studies will need to clearly determine the function of the gene variant, she added.

"More questions need to be answered before we can take any of these findings to clinical practice," Dr. Poon said. "For instance, we do not know what effect, if any, vitamin D levels would have on the risk of developing COPD and whether circulating vitamin D levels interact with genetic variants.

"Furthermore, we only selected two genes in the pathway, and there are numerous genes that are involved," she added. "If these findings are validated, then investigating the effect of this particular variant in the function of the vitamin D receptor will be important."

"A Variant In The Vitamin D Receptor Gene (VDR) Is Associated With Time To Onset Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) In Men" (Session B26, Monday, May 16, 8:15-10:45 a.m., Room 603 (Street Level), Colorado Convention Center; Abstract 17371)

* Please note that numbers in this release may differ slightly from those in the abstract. Many of these investigations are ongoing; the release represents the most up-to-date data available at press time.

Keely Savoie | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.thoracic.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>