Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New gene transfer strategy shows promise for limb girdle and other muscular dystrophies

09.07.2012
The challenge of treating patients with genetic disorders in which a single mutated gene is simply too large to be replaced using traditional gene therapy techniques may soon be a thing of the past.

A Nationwide Children's Hospital study describes a new gene therapy approach capable of delivering full-length versions of large genes and improving skeletal muscle function. The strategy may hold new hope for treating dysferlinopathies and other muscular dystrophies.

A group of untreatable muscle disorders known as dysferlinopathies are caused by mutations in the dysferlin gene. Patients with these disorders, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, are typically diagnosed in their early twenties. Approximately one-third will become wheelchair dependent by their mid-30s.

Gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver genes to cells has been pursued as an option for some patients with muscular dystrophy. However, AAV's packaging limitations have served as obstacles in using gene therapy to deliver large genes like dysferlin. Scientists in the past have attempted to work around AAV's packaging limitations by inserting a small version of large genes into the viral vector to induce gene expression. Some have also used more than one viral vector at a time to deliver a large gene. However, micro and mini versions of large genes don't always have the power of full-length gene expression and an increased viral load can lead to negative side effects.

"We have had success in the clinic using AAV gene therapy with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D, which is caused by mutations in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene," said Louise Rodino-Klapac, PhD, principal investigator in the Center for Gene Therapy at The Research Institute of Nationwide Children's Hospital. "However, the dysferlin gene is very large, about six times larger than the alpha-sarcoglycan gene and can't fit into a traditional AAV vector."

A 2008 study identified AAV5, an AAV serotype that could package large transcripts. "This made us wonder whether it could be used for gene replacement requiring inserts as large as the dysferlin gene," said Dr. Rodino-Klapac.

In their 2012 study appearing in PLoS ONE, Dr. Rodino-Klapac's team used AAV5 to package a full-length, intact dysferlin gene and directly deliver it to the diaphragm of dysferlin-deficient mice. They also injected the leg muscles of dysferlin-deficient mice using both intramuscular and vascular approaches to further evaluate whether the gene delivery could improve skeletal muscle function.

They found that both the intravascular and intramuscular delivery approaches led to full-length, intact dysferlin gene expression in the leg and diaphragm muscle cells of the mice. More importantly, they saw that the newly-restored dysferlin repaired membrane deficits previously seen in the dysferlin-deficient mice.

"Our findings demonstrate highly favorable results with full restoration of dysferlin without compromise in function," said Dr. Rodino-Klapac. "With regard to neuromuscular diseases, these studies provide new perspective for conditions caused by mutations of large genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common severe childhood muscular dystrophy and would seem to benefit from expression of the larger transcripts than mini- and micro-dystrophins that only partially restore physiologic function in mouse models of the disease."

Dr. Rodino-Klapac and her team are currently defining a path for a dysferlin clinical gene therapy trial. "We have shown that AAV5-dysferlin delivery is a very promising therapeutic approach that could restore functional deficits in dysferlinopathy patients," she says.

Grose WE, Clark KR, Griffin D, Malik V, Shontz KM, Montgomery CL, Lewis S, Brown RH Jr, Janssen PM, Mendell JR, Rodino-Klapac LR. Homologous Recombination Mediates Functional Recovery of Dysferlin Deficiency following AAV5 Gene Transfer. PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e39233. Epub 2012 Jun 15.

For more information on the Center for Gene Therapy, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/center-for-gene-therapy
For more information on The Research Institute, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/pediatric-research

For more information on Dr. Louise Rodino-Klapac, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/louise-rodino-klapac

Erin Pope | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nationwidechildrens.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht 'Y' a protein unicorn might matter in glaucoma
23.10.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

nachricht Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry
23.10.2017 | Rice University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>